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Our New Members in August

Millrace Marketing

Millrace Marketing is a content focused MarComms agency filled to the brim with ideas designed to get our clients noticed where it matters most. We have a commitment to sustainability and to those who are doing their part for the environment. We are passionate about making a difference, and believe in projects that protect and benefit people and planet.

Find out more about Millrace Marketing >>


North Wales Recycle IT CIC

We are a not-for-profit social enterprise (also termed a Community Interest Company) and the only treatment centre of this kind in North Wales, offering secure and professional recycling, re-use and disposal services for all IT equipment.

Find out more about North Wales Recycle IT >>


Alliance Marketing Agency Ltd

We’re a marketing and design agency based in Newport that helps tell your brand story through graphic and web design, digital marketing, and PR services.

Find out more about Alliance Marketing Agency Ltd >>


Newport City Council

Newport City Council (Cyngor Dinas Casnewydd) is the governing body for Newport, one of the Principal Areas of Wales. It consists of 51 councillors, who represent the city’s 20 wards.

Find out more about Newport City Council >>

Membership

The Cynnal Cymru network is a community of proactive organisations who share our vision and values. Members and partners are action focused and innovative, eager to learn and collaborate to find solutions and new ways of doing things for a more sustainable Wales.

On joining Cynnal Cymru, our members have access to a free sustainability assessment, action based training and a diverse network of like-minded people.

If you are committed to a sustainable future and interested in becoming a member or in partnering with us then we would love to hear from you. Find out more >>

Introducing Cynnal Cymru Members: Millrace Marketing

Who are Millrace Marketing and what do you do?

Millrace is a creative marketing and communication agency that is built on a passion for producing meaningful storytelling for brands.

Storytelling is an important aspect of marketing as it enables organisations to develop deeper connections with audiences, uniting people and driving stronger, deeper connections.

Millrace works with organisations across Wales (and beyond) to plan and produce campaigns that tell their stories to the audiences that matter most. Teamed with a solid strategy, we produce a mixture of visual and written campaigns that bring brands to life. Our services include:

  • Strategy
  • Planning
  • Motion Graphics
  • Graphic Design
  • Email campaigns
  • Social media campaigns
  • Blogs
  • Case Studies
  • News updates

Why does sustainability matter to your organisation?

We focus on being:

  • Authentic
  • Transparent
  • Honest
  • Realistic

As part of our commitment to people and planet we are constantly reviewing our own service provision to make this as sustainable as possible. To this end we have made some significant steps to make sure we are doing all we can, as pro-actively and as transparently as possible, to not just optimise material consumption and minimise waste but also to reduce our negative carbon footprint on the environment. 

We have a sustainability policy that incorporates environmental, social and financial targets (available to read on our website), and we are a Real Living Wage employer.

We also have pending B-Corporation Certification. Certified B Corporations are companies verified by the global B Lab to meet exceptionally high standards of social and environmental performance, transparency, and accountability. As a B-Corporation business we are required to amend articles of the business to embed a commitment to sustainability. We are also required to publicly list our B-Corporation scores, set public sustainability goals and will be audited regularly to assess our carbon footprint, carbon offsetting, waste and water management, energy usage and supply chains.  

We have set specific goals for the next year which include monitoring and recording Greenhouse Gas emissions and have set specific reduction targets relative to our initial performances, harvesting rainwater and reducing the impact of travel and commuting.

What are you hoping to achieve through Cynnal Cymru membership?

Becoming a member of Cynnal Cymru is another significant step for us to develop as a sustainable marketing and communication agency.  We are eager to learn from and collaborate with fellow members to find solutions and new ways of doing things for a more sustainable Wales. We are also looking forward to receiving sustainability consultations and training with the Cynnal Cymru advisors to help us further develop as a sustainable practice.  We are looking forward to offering free training in partnership with Cynical Cymru to all fellow members in the coming months.

What positive impact do you want to make in Wales/ the world?

In short, we want to work with organisations, businesses, charities and non-profits who are striving towards better outcomes for people and/or planet. We want to help them communicate their stories positively and authentically amongst their audiences, stakeholders and communities.

Tell us about a sustainability project you are working on at the moment

For Millrace, we are in the middle of becoming B Corp Certified after scoring above 85 in the initial assessment. This is important to us as it will help us strengthen our own policies and procedures to ensure our people, and the people we work with are aligned with our values and ongoing commitments.

Our clients have sustainability at the top of their agenda, either through choice or consumer pressure. We are currently communicating a variety of campaigns for a global medical waste organisation, Welsh housing associations, and a Welsh mental health charity.     

Find out more about us at millracemarketing.co.uk or if you’d like to talk further about a project, campaign or a design need then please contact Owen Brown, Client Relationship Manager via Owen@millracemarketing.co.uk

Lessons from Scotland on free school meals

This commitment has been broadly welcomed but its implementation brings to light many challenges currently faced by local authorities, catering staff, suppliers and others involved in school meal provision. These range from inadequate kitchen and dining facilities in schools not designed with universal school meal provision in mind, to the disconnect between what pupils learn about food and nutrition, and the experience of their school meal.  

To better understand how these challenges might be resolved, Cynnal Cymru is convening a series of roundtables to bring together those working in the different policy and operational areas of school meal provision. Our first, in May 22, was held primarily to learn from the experience of implementing universal free school meals (uFSM) in primary schools in Scotland, where the commitment is for all primary school children to have free school meals by August 2022. 

The speakers were Prof. Mary Brennan, University of Edinburgh Business School and Chair of the Scottish Food Coalition and Jayne Jones, Commercial Manager at Argyll & Bute Council and Chair of Assist FM –a non-profit association working to promote the facilities management services of all member local authorities in Scotland. The roundtable was chaired by Prof. Kevin Morgan from Cardiff University.  

Below is a summary of some key points shared by the presenters and attendees. The full meeting notes are also available. 

uFSM must be seen as a vehicle for multiple policy objectives 

The role that school food has to play in enhancing public health and well-being must be looked at in a context extending far beyond just provision of nutrition and calories. School food matters to many cross-cutting themes and is at the heart of a ‘good food nation’. 

Dining together in schools helps children develop important, but sometimes overlooked, eating and social skills, where new tastes and food combinations can be introduced in a safe environment and norms around use of cutlery and avoiding waste can be set. Social eating also provides an opportunity for relaxation that aids afternoon learning.  Alongside the immediate benefits, these things will also help shape future food and lifestyle choices. 

In terms of the wider school community, the experience in Scotland suggests that universal provision benefits all families including those with time or knowledge constraints, as well as financial ones. 

Universal provision can also provide local economic multipliers particularly if there is investment in building links with local businesses.  It can be a driver for high quality farming and fishing, enhancing animal welfare and supporting and creating new routes to market for food businesses. It can also be an opportunity to trial methods of procurement and production compliant with Net Zero and nature recovery ambitions.  

Mary Brennan argues that what is needed is an annual forensic analysis to understand how uFSM provision is contributing to other policy areas in Scotland but this has not so far happened. 

It is essential to develop systems thinking capacity to understand how school food can deliver across different policy areas 

One of the biggest challenges in Scotland has been getting Ministers and officials to understand the operational realities and challenges that school catering staff face. The school canteen is a relentless and demanding operational environment and staff are usually not employed outside term-time or food preparation/supervision/clean-up times. There is therefore no time or space for strategic thinking to review, reflect or plan. The same is often true with local authorities with very little resource, which can lead to paralysis and a default to doing things the way they have always been done rather than trying to maximise or diversify policy outcomes. 

In Scotland, Assist FM argued for investment in management as well as frontline staff to aid the transition to uFSM in recognition of the need for this thinking and planning time and to ensure they weren’t spreading already stretched management staff too thinly. 

It is not just the food that should be valued  

The key role of dining staff in school has also been recognised in Scottish research. The extent of many of the benefits of social eating in schools – particularly around the amount of time spent eating (and therefore producing less waste) – was found to correlate directly with the amount of dining supervision available, yet the hours and numbers of dining supervisors are often vulnerable to cost-cutting.  

This links to another obstacle in expanding uFSM provision – the recruitment and retention of supervision and catering staff. Scottish research suggests that recognising more overtly the insights and contributions from these staff can expedite successful uFSM implementation, through staff development and providing space for learning and professionalisation of school catering. Attendees agreed that the whole food sector – from farming to catering – needs to be understood and promoted as a career path. 

Conclusions and next steps 

Implementing uFSM may involve complex trade-offs but there is also the potential for multiple co-benefits from a singular investment. In Wales this is a key opportunity to look at food through the lens of the Well-Being of Future Generations Act, incorporating net zero, nature recovery, equality, foundational economy and other aims. 

The clearest outcome from this session was that the ‘cost’ of school food needs to be reframed as an investment in better health and environmental outcomes and an investment in our learners (as opposed to just investing in the learning itself). We hear of redefining ‘value’ in public procurement to include the social and environmental value created from spending public money. With the publication of the Social Partnerships and Public Procurement Bill this shift should now be at the forefront of government’s mind. The provision of uFSM is an opportunity to put this into practise. 

Future sessions will consider how this investment can be made and how other operational challenges raised but not included in this piece can be resolved. These include how to increase flexibility within menu design to be able to cope rising food prices, uncertainty of supply and other ‘what if..’ scenarios; the challenges faced by schools with insufficient or no catering facilities; and how this policy aim can also support a more diverse and progressive food system in Wales, including links with the Community Food Strategy. 

If you would like to join future roundtables or have ideas or comments around this or future themes, please contact Clare Sain-ley-Berry clare@cynnalcymru.com. 

Grow your Own – The Hywel Dda approach to building local skills and well-being

In 2019 Hywel Dda University Health Board took a bold step to start an Apprenticeship Academy. This was partly in response to the increasing financial costs of using agency staff to make up for the shortfall in employed Adult General Nurses. It was also, however, in recognition of the opportunity that the University Health Board had, as an anchor institution, to improve opportunities and well-being in its local area.

Recruitment had been a long-standing problem. There is no nursing college in the local area and those that have studied elsewhere, and begun to make lives for themselves, often prefer to find work in the same place. Recruitment from within local communities has therefore been a challenge, as even those students originating from the UHB area may not always choose to return once qualified. The UHB was also conscious that recruitment practices that simply attracted staff from other health board areas would just create problems elsewhere. A programme that could nurture and develop skills amongst the existing local population was seen as a more pragmatic, sustainable approach and one that would fit with the UHB’s values. The Apprenticeship Academy was therefore born.

The initial apprenticeship programme included two pathways: Healthcare and Patient Experience. This has already expanded to include many other pathways including areas as diverse as Engineering and Corporate Governance. The Healthcare Apprentice Programme, however, which can develop individuals from entry level to Nurse registration within seven years, remains its flagship. Its aim is to develop a future nursing workforce through targeted skills development, working with local employment organisations, educational institutions and youth organisations to promote and tailor apprenticeship opportunities. 

The establishment of the Academy has, of course, faced challenges, not least in the unprecedented number of applications and onboarding of apprentices. In 2021 alone there were over 600 applicants, with only 40 places on offer. The high standard of applicants, however, did provide the UHB with confidence to increase the places on offer to 57.

A secondary challenge was integrating the apprenticeship programme within the culture and working practices of a large, established workforce. To help navigate this, a ‘Reverse Mentoring’ scheme was put in place that has allowed apprentices to share their experiences and ideas through providing mentoring and guidance to members of the Health Board. Apprentices were also invited, with the Board’s support, to present at the 2021 Nursing and Midwifery conference, in recognition of their achievements. This gave members of the apprenticeship programme another opportunity to share learning first hand with those that might also find themselves working with apprentices, or even be thinking of starting programmes themselves.

One example of the value that this programme has brought was highlighted when the Academy Team was able to offer additional support to the Directors responsible for the staffing and implementation of Mass Vaccination Centres throughout the Health Board area.  Andrew Cavill (Job title) explains that the 2021 apprentices “have stepped up and stepped forward to support the vaccination effort, undertaking additional training to offer immunisation and administrative support to patients across all counties”.

The programme has also contributed to wider and longer-term benefits. The Academy has a principle of not taking on an apprentice unless there is a job available for that person at the end of the apprenticeship programme. This has encouraged services to look at their future staffing needs and start to plan early for how these can be met. On this basis, 100 apprentices have already been taken on with a pledge to deliver 1,000 apprenticeships by 2030 – an ambition that will not only grow local job opportunities but help to provide better health care, training, skills and well-being in the local foundational economy.

Photo od the three new members of staff

Cynnal Cymru welcomes three new staff members

In the last month, Cynnal Cymru has welcomed three new employees to support our growing work programme. Our team of 12 sustainability specialists work to support organisations across three core programme areas: (i) low carbon economy, (ii) natural environment and (iii) fair and just society.

To support our Nature Wise training programme, led by Clare Sain-Ley-Berry, we welcome our new Training and Development officer Sara Wynne-Pari. Together they will be helping more organisations in Wales to improve their understanding of the nature crisis and take action to reverse it.

To take forward the real Living Wage in Wales and support Welsh Government’s fair work agenda, we welcome Grace Robinson as the Living Wage Programme Officer and Alys Reid to support with the accreditations. Alys will also be supporting the Cynnal Cymru team in her role as HR and Administraton Officer.


Sara Wynne-Pari

Based in North Wales, Sara joined us in April as our new Training and Development officer. Sara will be delivering Nature Wise eco literacy programme. She has a background in supporting and mentoring environmental volunteer organisations and developing cross sector partnership projects in natural environment, sustainable development and pro-environmental behaviour change. 

Alongside her role at Cynnal Cymru, Sara also works part-time for Llais y Goedwig, the grassroots network organisation for community woodlands in Wales.

In her spare time, she enjoys nothing more than making the most of her backyard in Snowdonia whether that’s exploring, swimming or riding her electric bike.

Grace Robinson

Grace is the newly appointed Living Wage Programme Officer. She was born in Cardiff and has lived here most of her life – the only exception being an undergraduate degree in Swansea. She has a background in human resources and has always been passionate about equality, justice and fair work practices. Grace previously worked on the Living Wage Programme during her master’s degree in HR, which is what made her enthusiastic about this particular initiative. She looks forward to working for Cynnal Cymru and advocating for the Living Wage across Wales.

In her spare time, Grace enjoys being as creative as possible and always has a project on the go (currently a baby blanket for an expecting friend). She also enjoys being active and going for a sea swim when she can.

Alys Reid Bacon

Alys is joining us as a HR & Administrative Officer to provide support on the Living Wage accreditation process and Cynnal Cymru’s human resources. Alys is fluent in both Welsh and English and is currently working on her PhD in Biological Sciences, titled, “The influence of genotype, environment & management factors on yield development, grain filling & grain quality in oats”.

She has experience of dealing with members of the public in different environments, including as a hospital receptionist, administrative assistant and Ward Clerk and as a Youth Worker. She has also been involved in work to promote STEM subjects in schools across mid Wales funded by Salters’ chemistry institute.

Alys is passionate about sustainability and enjoys spending her free time walking, sea swimming, cooking, eating and gaming.

Yellow TSE is Coming to Cardiff City Centre

Yellow TSE will open its doors in the Morgan Arcade on Earth Day 2022, for an exclusive launch event to celebrate sustainable business and a new way of shopping coming to Cardiff.

Founder and CEO Tamsin Ford, has planned, plotted, lived and breathed, Yellow TSE for the past three years. When COVID-19 hit, she wasn’t sure it would ever be a reality. But, after battling all hurdles in her way, it’s full steam ahead for this inspirational business venture.

Tamsin is well-known for sustainable retail through her business born in Pontcanna, Blossom & Nectar. Now home to the second location for Yellow TSE, Blossom & Nectar fuelled her passion for sustainable business and inspired her to encourage wider change in retail

Following the launch event, the Morgan Quarter venue will under-go sustainable construction work from Sampson Carpentry & Build, who have worked with businesses such as Kin & Ilk to deliver stylish and sustainable fittings.

The venue is set to be open for the public in May 2022 in plenty of time for what’s set to be abooming summer in the Welsh Capital, post-Covid restrictions. Featuring art from KatherineJones Artist, and other local sustainable businesses as concessions, Yellow TSE is your one-stop sustainable shop, work-space, and cafe in Cardiff City Centre.

Get a taste for what’s to come at Yellow TSE, in Pontcanna. Already open for business, the secondary venue is settling in nicely to the suburb, with many locals eager to get their hands on the app as soon as possible.

Tanya Lynch, Creative Director and Expert Connector for Yellow TSE, said:

“The journey of Yellow TSE is one story I’m so proud to be a part of. So far it’s required a lot of blood, sweat and tears and an unbelievable amount of patience.

Our founder Tams is one remarkable human being who is carving the way for a better and more sustainable shopping experience. It takes passion, grit and dedication to launch such an epic business venture. Tams and her team will bring a department store like no other to the streets of South Wales. I do believe the people of Cardiff will love what Yellow has to offer!”

It’s out with the old and in with Yellow TSE. Sustainable shopping is not for a niche group of people and it’s not a trend, it’s for all and it’s the future.

Find out more on the TSE website >>

Opening & closing times:
Pontcanna: 10-5.30 Wednesday- Saturday
11-4 Sunday
Morgan Quarter: 9.30-6 Mon-Sat
11-4 Sundays

Location:
Pontcanna: 6 Pontcanna Mews, Pontcanna, Cardiff
Morgan Quarter: 1 Barry Lane, Morgan Quarter, Cardiff

New Campaign Calls on Motorists to ‘Drive your Litter Home’

With more vehicles than ever before on our roads and a significant increase in our food and drink on-the-go culture, roadside litter is a growing problem in Wales. It is harmful to our environment and wildlife. It ruins the beautiful views for locals and visitors alike, whilst also being difficult, dangerous and expensive to clean up.

Research shows that 78% of vehicle litterers feel guilty after littering. [i] Keep Wales Tidy’s new campaign encourages drivers to have a guilt free journey with no regrets and to ‘Drive your litter home’.

The nationwide campaign is being run as part of Caru Cymru (a Welsh phrase meaning ‘Love Wales’) – an inclusive movement led by Keep Wales Tidy and councils to inspire people to take action and care for the environment.

As part of the campaign, outdoor advertising will appear across roadside litter hotspots in Wales such as roadside billboards, back of buses and petrol pump adverts. This will also include radio and digital audio advertising to target drivers listening to their favorite channels.

Advertising will step up a gear during busy weekends and bank holidays over the summer months to target as many drivers as possible.

Keep Wales Tidy has also developed resources for haulage companies and other commercial drivers to utilise.

Keep Wales Tidy Chief Executive Lesley Jones said:

“We’re putting our foot down on roadside litter. Not only is it a blight on our beautiful country, and often the first thing visitors see when arriving into Wales, but it also has a significant impact on our environment and wildlife. We estimate that the cost of collection and disposing of roadside litter in Wales is at least £3.5 million every year.

Our new roadside litter campaign takes ‘do the right thing’ up a gear by highlighting how littering makes people feel. The vast majority of drivers know that littering from their vehicle is unacceptable, and we want everyone to have a guilt free journey with no regrets.

When you’re out and about in your vehicle please leave nothing behind you. Keep your conscience and our roadsides clear by driving your litter home or disposing of it in the nearest bin.”

To find out more and download free materials, visit the Keep Wales Tidy website: www.keepwalestidy.cymru/caru-cymru    

Caru Cymru has received funding through the Welsh Government Rural Communities – Rural Development Programme 2014-2020, which is funded by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and the Welsh Government.


[i] Highways England. (2021). Understanding Vehicle Littering Research Report.

Our New Members in March

FOR Cardiff

FOR Cardiff is the business improvement district (BID) for Cardiff city centre. As a BID they are elected and subsequently funded by the non domestic rates payers within a defined area – they collect an annual levy from these organisations and use those funds to deliver a five year business plan.

Their current business plan runs from 2021-2026 and includes ambitions to help Cardiff businesses transition to a greener economy, alongside a host of other projects such as promoting the city to a wider audience, improving the safety of the city centre, and improving the public realm.

Find out more about FOR Cardiff >>

Greener Globe Funeral Awards

As a company in development, GGFA is a budding example of how individual sectors are working towards the global goal of net-zero emissions, by developing a sustainability framework specifically for funeral directors.

Offering a bespoke service to each member, the GGFA will provide guidance and support for funeral directors so they can make a positive environmental impact with the resources available to them. It will provide recognition of this impact through a four-tier award system, which can be used by members to showcase their work around the sustainability agenda to customers, stakeholders, and the broader community.

More information about GGFA will be available soon.

Membership


The Cynnal Cymru network is a community of proactive organisations who share our vision and values. Members and partners are action focused and innovative, eager to learn and collaborate to find solutions and new ways of doing things for a more sustainable Wales.

On joining Cynnal Cymru, our members have access to a free sustainability assessment, action based training and a diverse network of like-minded people.

If you are committed to a sustainable future and interested in becoming a member or in partnering with us then we would love to hear from you. Find out more >>

The Carbon Cost of your Christmas Tree

As the Partner in Wales for the Carbon Literacy Project and a growing team working on our consultancy offer– we are often considering, as a Team, the Carbon cost of everyday choices. Sometimes, at Christmas we can get overwhelmed by wanting to enjoy the festive season to the fullest but also make the most ethical and environmentally friendly choices.

We’re hoping the below considerations from Karolina can help you to do that regarding your Christmas tree;

According to Carbon Trust, the fake tree has a much higher carbon footprint than a real tree, because of the processes that go into producing one.

The estimated carbon footprint of a fake tree is 40kg, compared to 16kgs for a real tree (if both end in a landfill).

So, the emissions to avoid after Christmas aren’t the ones produced by eating too many sprouts. The real issue is to do with the disposal of the trees – real or fake.  If both trees end up in landfill – the fake tree might take hundreds of years to decompose, whilst the real tree will emit methane – a very potent greenhouse gas.

If you want to avoid these trees going to landfill, you can reuse the fake tree and pass it on to your family (think of it as an heirloom tree – a forever tree that can be passed down through the generations). Whereas a real tree can be chopped and turned into wood chips that can later be used for mulching.

The best thing you can do to keep your Carbon emissions down is to plant a tree in a pot, watch it grow, bring it indoors for Christmas and take it outdoors until the next year. Or, adorn your existing plants at home with festive LED lights.

Growing real Christmas trees at mass might take away precious land that can be used for creating carbon sinks, in other words, real forests for people and wildlife.

So, if you want to be environmentally friendly this season, use what you have at home and garden already, have a friendly chat with small scale suppliers as to how they manage their land to learn about the process of growing trees, and focus on planting trees or shrubs at the right time and at the right place in your community.

Dr Karolina Rucinska, Sustainability Consultant

Making Global Goals Local Business Roadshow: Cardiff

14 October 14:00 – 16:30 BST

Since 2017, the UN Global Compact Network UK has travelled across the UK to connect sustainability practitioners, inspire action and equip you with the knowledge and skills to effectively engage with Agenda 2030 and its sustainable development goals. In the lead-up to COP26, this workshop will allow you to dive into developing a whole systems approach to delivering the global goals and develop an understanding of how to lead action for Agenda 2030.

Speakers include Sarah Hopkins, Director at Cynnal Cymru and Sophie Howe, Office of the Future Generations Commissioner for Wales.

Register for the event.

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