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Grasshopper Communications Takes First Steps in Becoming Carbon Literate

One of our members, Grasshopper Communications recently completed Carbon Literacy training with us. This is how director, Hannah Dineen feels the training has impacted the organisation to take action on climate change both internally and on a personal level…

Many of us may feel we care about the climate change emergency but feel overwhelmed about how much information is out there and how to take action to actually make a difference.

For me personally, having just attended Cynnal Cymru’s Carbon Literacy Training, I feel better equipped to take action to make a difference to reduce my carbon footprint and carbon offset.

So, we’re all aware the world is getting warmer and we’ve got a climate emergency. The NASA time machine has helped me to clearly visualise how the earth’s key climate indicators (sea ice, sea level, carbon dioxide and global temperature) have changed over my lifetime.

So how will this affect you and me?

Climate change is already happening before our eyes. Rainfall patterns are becoming increasingly unpredictable with a shift towards a ‘feast and famine’ regime. The potential for declining water availability and potential water scarcity is likely to have a negative affect on agricultural (crop or pasture) production resulting in food price spikes.

The floods in South Wales in February 2020 hit the poorest communities, many of whom lacked insurance to cover the cost of the wrecked belongings and struggling to pay for repairs.

Rising sea levels is threatening many of our flood defences.  Defending seaside towns and villages, roads and railways will prove costly and unsustainable. Natural Resources Wales are therefore exploring opportunities for nature based solutions and adaption to our coast.

Climate change is also changing the patterns of migratory birds and increasing pests and diseases. The RSPB has responded by exploring different management techniques.  The parts of the Ynyshir reserve in the Dyfi estuary has now been allowed to flood during high tides and storms, creating a much needed new marshland for the migrating birds.

So how can we make a difference? 

DRIVERS OF CLIMATE CHANGE

Our use of energy is one of the major contributors to climate change. We need to reduce our energy consumption and our reliance on fossil fuels. For starters, we could all switch to a green energy provider or invest in a community energy share offer.

The Welsh Government has set a target for 70% of Wales’ electricity to be generated by renewables by 2030. The Welsh Government report ‘Energy Generation in Wales : 2019’ shows positive signs towards meeting the target and estimates that 51% of electricity consumption comes from renewables.

Additionally, renewable energy projects bring co-benefits, for example Vattenfall’s Pen y Cymoedd wind farm in the South Wales Valleys, has supported over 100 local jobs and an annual investment of £1.8m to make a difference to the lives of local people.

The construction and running of buildings is a significant contributor to our carbon footprint. Whether it’s school, hospitals, offices or homes, the development sector is striving to achieve net zero buildings. We are looking forward to delivering communications on behalf of a collaboration of 68 partners, managed by Sero, that has just been awarded £7m of Welsh Government’s  Optimised Retrofit Funding to roll out the large scale decarbonisation of homes across Wales.

The Royal Town Planning Institute’s campaign ‘Plan the World We Need’ is calling on governments across the UK and Ireland to capitalise on the expertise of planners to achieve a sustainable, resilient and inclusive recovery and meet net-zero targets by 2050.

The recent Cynnal Cymru event, ‘Greening the Screen’ showcased how the film production industry is becoming more sustainable.  Arup’s recent research ‘A Screen New Deal’ shows that  an average tentpole film production generates 2,840 tonnes of CO2e, the equivalent amount absorbed by 3,709 acres of forest in a year.  The report recommends the industry strive to reuse materials, design sets for deconstruction and repurpose thus additionally contributing to the Circular Economy agenda.

Roger Williams from Joio Production spoke of how sustainability was put at the heart of producing the latest series of Bang on S4C.  Commitment to deliver positive sustainable actions resulted in removing paper cups from set, only printing call sheets on request, advocating the use of public transport and sourcing costumes from local charity shops.

Communities are equally coming together to act. The Edible Porthmadog project shows how residents and school children have reused old boats as planters for fruit and vegetables to provide local produce to local people.  The Llani Car Club provides its 27 members access to a car (including electric car).  The members have shared how it has helped them to reduce their car mileage, car share more and learn how to use public transport.  The Awel Co-op runs two wind turbines on Mynydd y Gwrhyd, 20 miles north of Swansea providing enough energy to supply over 2,500 homes.  The profits help tackle fuel poverty and develop other renewable energy projects.

So, pause for a moment.  Do you know what you are contributing to climate change?  Why not calculate your organisation’s emissions or calculate your carbon footprint as a household? If you want to know more, ‘How bad are bananas?’ by Mike Berners gives an invaluable and entertaining guide that shows just what effect everything has on carbon emissions, from a Google search to a plastic bag, from a flight to a volcano.

The carbon literacy training has spurred me on to act and embed carbon reduction into my daily lifestyle and encourage others to do the same.

Our next Carbon Literacy open course takes place from 14-17 December, and spaces are now open.

Visit: https://bit.ly/CC_CarbonLiteracy

Cynnal Cymru Update: Adapting to a New ‘Normal’

[:en]As we all adjust and adapt to a new ‘normal’, we wanted to give you an update on our plans for the coming months.

Among the challenges faced by so many at the moment, we are seeing reasons to be hopeful about the future. Precedents are being set as organisations adapt to new ways of working and members of our network are reaching out to each other to offer innovative support and help.

As things are changing rapidly, we will be sharing more regular ‘mini’ updates, in addition to our monthly newsletter, to keep you inspired and informed on the latest sustainability news, views and opportunities. You can sign up here for our free newsletter.

We are exploring new ways we can bring our networking, training and events online to continue sharing learning, challenging thinking and mobilising action.  For example, we are prioritising the creation of digital training on Carbon Literacy for housing associations, local authorities and businesses.

Next week, we are introducing a new weekly Cynnal Coffee Club to provide a shared space to capture learning and spark ideas for a more resilient Wales.

For Members, we will be setting up virtual networking, so we can continue to bring people together to share ideas and opportunities.

We’re also heartened to see so many inspiring initiatives springing up in our communities; supported by the generosity of individuals and organisations, so please let us know what is happening in your community and we will share as much as possible.

Thank you for your continued support and stay strong.

Sarah, Lynsey, Rhodri, Clare & Lois
Rainbow artwork provided by our temporary new co-worker Isla (7)
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Coleg Cambria Students Join forces With a Wildlife Organisation to Help Save the Red Squirrel Population

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Level 3 NVQ Animal Management learners at Coleg Cambria Llysfasi built feeders and nest boxes for the animals and monitored their progress at enclosures in Clocaenog forest, near Ruthin, during a reinforcement project.

They have been supporting the work of Red Squirrels Trust Wales and Natural Resources Wales, who are fighting to save the species following a century-long decline in numbers.

There are an estimated 120,000-150,000 reds in the UK – and as few as 15,000 in England – since grey squirrels were introduced into the UK from America in the 1870s. Previously, red squirrels were commonly seen throughout the country.

Cambria students have also been helping to save the local hedgehog population in partnership with Hedgehog Help Prestatyn and are exploring a new dormouse project, as the tiny creatures are also disappearing at an alarming rate.

Llysfasi lecturer Kirstie Fraser said the students are gaining vital experience as part of the conservation initiatives, and proud to be playing a part in their survival.

“The Clocaenog project has been a success so far with several captive-bred red squirrels released back into the wild to mix with the remnant population and boost genetics,” said Kirstie.

“They have been brought into the forest from various locations with the help of the Welsh Mountain Zoo in Colwyn Bay, and other breeding centres.

“The learners have also built feeder boxes with cameras trained on them so we can follow the squirrels’ progress, and they’ve cleaned and collected branches and greenery for the enclosures.”

She added: “Following health tests, the red squirrels were fitted with radio collars. Students were taught how to track their movements in the forest and then to analyse the data.

“It has been a brilliant project for them, and most importantly in trying to reverse the huge population decline.”

The red squirrel is officially classed as ‘Near Threatened’ in Wales, England and Northern Ireland but is a common sight in forests across Scotland.

The main cause of their demise was the introduction of grey squirrels in the 19th century; this species carries a Parapoxvirus disease, which does not appear to affect their health but does kill red squirrels, and they also out-compete the reds for food and other resources. A loss of woodland has played a major role as well.

Becky Clews-Roberts, who was Red Squirrel Ranger for the Clocaenog forest project, thanked Coleg Cambria for its support of the scheme.

“I would not hesitate to ask them for help again,” she said.

“They are a very hard-working group and take an interest in what they are doing. Many, many thanks to Coleg Cambria Llysfasi for your help.”

To support the red squirrels project and find out more, visit www.clocaenog-rst.org and https://www.redsquirrelsunited.org.uk/[:]

Ecosurety Launch £1million Exploration Fund

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Can you help us make a meaningful impact on the environment?

Over three years the Ecosurety Exploration Fund will invest £1million in projects that can reduce the environmental impact of packaging, batteries or WEEE through innovation or research in the UK.

The £1 million fund will be spread over three years and the application process is open to any UK registered company, charity, not-for-profit or academic organisation. The winning projects will be selected by an independent judging panel that so far includes Peter Maddox, Director of WRAP, Libby Peake, Senior Policy Advisor at Green Alliance and Mike Barry, former Sustainability Director at Marks and Spencer.

How to get involved

Applicants can apply for up to £150k and the project could be led individually or collaboratively with other organisations to plan and deliver it.

Full information, including details about the submission criteria and how to apply, can be found here: www.ecosurety.com/impact/exploration-fund.

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Keep Wales Tidy team up once again with McDonald’s to tackle marine litter

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Following the success of last years All Wales Beach Clean, Keep Wales Tidy are targeting rivers and waterways, along with beaches across Wales in a month-long campaign.  In partnership with McDonald’s, Marine Clean Cymru will take place from the 20th of September to 20th of October.

Community groups, schools and businesses from across Wales will be joining the month of action, organising clean up events up and down the country.

Marine litter is a growing threat to our aquatic and coastal environment, with 80% coming from land-based sources. Since litter found in rivers, canals and waterways eventually makes its way into our oceans, the problem of marine litter isn’t just relevant to coastal communities.

Lesley Jones, Chief Executive for Keep Wales Tidy said:

“We’re all responsible for the health of our oceans, so it’s crucial that we come together to make a real and lasting difference to our marine environment. Join us to work in partnership on this clean-up campaign and show how we’re caring for Wales and the wider world together.”

Marine Clean Cymru is being supported by McDonald’s, with volunteers from restaurants up and down the country planning on giving up their time to clean up their local beach or waterway.

Franchisee Ron Mounsey, who owns and operates 16 restaurants in South Wales, says:

“I’m delighted that McDonald’s is involved in this fantastic campaign for the second year. As a business we understand the important role that we play in making Wales a cleaner place for everyone and an enjoyable place to live, work and visit. We’re committed to playing our part in tackling litter and part of this is by supporting this campaign to clean up our local beaches and waterways. I look forward to seeing the difference that the events up and down the country will make to our local environment.”

Marine Clean Cymru has received funding through the Welsh Government Rural Communities – Rural Development Programme 2014-2020, which is funded by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and the Welsh Government.

To get involved, visit the Keep Wales Tidy website: www.keepwalestidy.cymru

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Yn dilyn llwyddiant Ymgyrch Glanhau Traethau Cymru Gyfan y llynedd, mae Cadwch Gymru’n Daclus yn targedu afonydd, dyfrffyrdd ynghyd a thraethau ar draws Cymru mewn ymgyrch dros fis.  Mewn partneriaeth â McDonald’s, cynhelir Glanhau Moroedd Cymrurhwng 20 Medi a 20 Hydref.

Bydd grwpiau cymunedol, ysgolion a busnesau ar draws Cymru yn cymryd rhan yn y mis o weithredu, gan drefnu digwyddiadau glanhau ar hyd a lled y wlad.

Mae sbwriel morol yn fygythiad cynyddol i’n hamgylchedd dyfrol ac arfordirol, gydag 80% yn dod o ffynonellau ar y tir. Gan fod sbwriel sy’n cael ei ganfod mewn afonydd, camlesi a dyfrffyrdd yn gwneud ei ffordd i’n moroedd yn y pen draw, nid yw problem sbwriel morol yn berthnasol i gymunedau arfordirol yn unig.

Dywedodd Lesley Jones, Prif Weithredwr Cadwch Gymru’n Daclus:

“Rydyn ni i gyd yn gyfrifol am iechyd ein cefnforoedd, felly mae’n hanfodol ein bod ni’n dod at ein gilydd i wneud gwahaniaeth gwirioneddol a pharhaol i’n hamgylchedd morol. Ymunwch â ni i weithio mewn partneriaeth ar yr ymgyrch lanhau hon a dangos sut rydyn ni’n gofalu am Gymru a’r byd ehangach gyda’n gilydd.”

Cefnogir Glanhau Moroedd Cymru gan McDonald’s, gyda gwirfoddolwyr o fwytai ar hyd a lled y wlad yn bwriadu rhoi o’u hamser i lanhau eu traeth lleol.

Dywed Franchisee Ron Mounsey, sydd yn rhedeg ac yn berchen ar 16 o fwytai yn Ne Cymru:

“Rwyf wrth fy modd bod McDonald’s yn gysylltiedig â’r ymgyrch rhagorol hwn am yr ail flwyddyn. Fel busnes rydym yn deall y rôl bwysig sydd gennym yn gwneud Cymru’n lle glanach i bawb ac yn lle dymunol i fyw, gweithio ac ymweld ag ef. Rydym wedi ymrwymo i chwarae ein rhan yn mynd i’r afael â sbwriel a rhan o hyn yw cefnogi’r ymgyrch hwn i lanhau ein traethau a’n dyfrffyrdd lleol. Edrychaf ymlaen at weld y gwahaniaeth y bydd y digwyddiadau ar hyd a lled y wlad yn ei wneud i’n hamgylchedd lleol.”

Mae Glanhau Moroedd Cymru wedi cael cyllid trwy Gymunedau Gwledig Llywodraeth Cymru – Rhaglen Datblygu Gwledig 2014-2020, a ariennir gan Gronfa Amaethyddol Ewrop ar gyfer Datblygu Gwledig a Llywodraeth Cymru.

I gymryd rhan, ewch i wefan Cadwch Gymru’n Daclus: www.keepwalestidy.cymru

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25 September | It’s a Wonderful World

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Royal Welsh College Symphonic Brass and Percussion go green, in a concert with an environmental theme.

It’s up to musicians to look after the planet, too – and on 25 September the Royal Welsh College Symphonic Brass and Percussion go green, in a concert with an environmental theme. Featuring brand new brass and percussion instruments specially created for the event, and an energising 21st century programme, it’s a lunchtime concert to inspire as well as entertain. Sustainability has never sounded so good!

Tickets: £8 on the day, £6 in advance

Venue: Dora Stoutzker Hall

Booking via the rwcmd.ac.uk website[:]

Community Car-sharing with Hiya Car

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Since 2016, we have been working with our partners and members to identify trends and opportunities that will make our transport system cleaner, safer, fairer and low carbon. The concept of “shared mobility” has evolved during this time and our latest member, Hiyacar, is offering a new take on an old idea. The established model of car hire, where people would rent cars from a company, has evolved to a new model which makes the most of the assets already in communities. Essentially, this is neighbour to neighbour car rental and Hiyacar provides the platform and safeguards that allow people to share cars with confidence.

Hiyacar’s goal is to give communities around the UK freedom at their fingertips: financial freedom for owners and the freedom to access a car when needed for hirers. Hiyacar has over 70,000 members across the UK and it is scaling to deliver the benefits of car sharing to communities and organisations around the country. This type of car sharing contributes to the goals of the Well-being of Future Generations Act by providing equality of opportunity to people who may not own a car but need to travel to, for example, job interviews or education/health services and cannot easily do so by public transport or active travel options.

Sharing also enables households to feel that they no longer need to own a second car, or even a car at all. Hiya car believe that car sharing also provides a lower carbon car solution as in time, less cars will be produced, total miles driven is normally reduced and, as mostly small, more efficient cars are used, less carbon is produced per mile driven. Employers can build on this by encouraging people to commute via public transport or active travel; then at work, employees who need to drive can use a vehicle owned by the organisation or alternatively can hire a colleague’s car (perhaps one who has to drive to work, perhaps providing “car pooling” lifts to colleagues when they do), which in turn can reduce the need for organisations to maintain a fleet  of “pool” cars.

Hiyacar is also strongly promoting electric vehicle sharing and offers commission free hires to anybody who shares their EV. Together with Hiyacar’s technology and the insurance provided for each hire even rural communities can benefit from safe and simple car sharing and access to EVs today, without any need for technology other than a mobile phone. The model may prove to be useful for communities that have their own renewable energy supply and can use local energy to power communal EVs. We also wonder if economically marginalised communities could benefit from this approach as it could provide additional income to households with no set up costs or commitments and provide a cheaper alternative to taxis.

 

The background to Hiyacar

Co-founders Graeme Risby and Rob Larmour first met aged 16 behind the deli counter in their local supermarket. They bumped into each other again by chance years later and the seed of Hiyacar was created.

Graeme worked long hours in the City and was very aware that his car cost him money just to sit on his drive being not so much an asset, but more of a liability. Paired with e-commerce expert Rob, the duo realised that a car-sharing app – think ‘Airbnb for cars’ – might offer a smarter, more sustainable way for people in the UK to hire rather than booking from a pool of corporate owned vehicles sitting on a forecourt or street.

The idea also responds to an increasing societal challenge; the loss of community. It’s a common held belief that there’s no sense of community spirit in the age of digital communication and people don’t know their neighbours anymore. Graeme and Rob strongly believe the sharing economy can help us regain our sense of community as we share our ‘stuff’ and help each other live smarter.

 

How can you share your car?

The barriers to car hire were both overcome when Hiyacar was founded – the transferring of keys used to be a hassle and people worried about how they or their car would be insured if there was an accident.

Hiyacar solved the key issue by implementing QuickStart, a keyless technology solution from their partners Contiental that allows owners to give access to drivers (who could be their family, neighbour or colleagues as well as a vetted member of the public) who request their car via a “digital key” on the driver’s Hiyacar mobile app. The insurance is enabled by a unique, comprehensive insurance policy developed with AXA that completely supersedes personal policies.

The platform continues to evolve and change. For example, ‘Mates Rates’ allows people to share cars with their family and friends at a discounted rate, without jeopardising the car owner’s own insurance.

 

In Summary

Hiyacar offers a new model for community mobility and a mechanism to turn cars from liabilities to assets. Core to this is Hiyacar’s game changing technology which simplifies and speeds up car sharing while removing old risks and barriers. Hiyacar will accelerate the pace at which peer to peer car sharing becomes a standard model.

Any community or organisation who would like to explore how car sharing can support their goals can just contact phil@hiyacar.co.u while any driver or owner can just go to www.hiyacar.co.uk and sign up sign up with code “cynnal” for £20 off a first hiya or £30 extra on a first share.[:]

Job Opportunity | Living Streets Cymru

[:en]Living Streets wants to create a walking nation, where everybody has the chance to gain from the health and social benefits this simple act can bring. Walking is also a vital ingredient of successful communities. Walkable towns and cities are often more vibrant socially and economically. Living Streets manages innovative national projects, working with schools, communities and workplaces to encourage more people to walk short journeys.

They are looking for two creative and confident communications professionals to join a dynamic Policy and Communications team at Living Streets. As part of the team, you’ll play a key role in helping strengthen the voice for walking and ensuring their message is heard in Wales. You will be a member of the Policy and Communications department and work day to day with the Living Streets Cymru team.

To excel in this role, you’ll need to be organised, collaborative and resourceful and have a good understanding of a variety of communications channels specific to Scotland and Wales. You’ll work closely with our wider policy and communications, project delivery and commercial teams and play a central role in communicating the impact we’re having in our work throughout Wales. Your role will involve ensuring all our communications in Wales are on brand and our impact is reflected in the Welsh media. For Wales, fluency in writing and speaking in the Welsh language is a must. You will also help to raise our profile throughout Wales via smaller, targeted communications projects and wider stakeholder engagement.

Salary range: £26,519 to £33,513 per annum pro rata

Location: Cardiff

Hours: 17.5 hours per week (over 3 days a week)

Contract: Fixed term contract for 18 months from the start date

Closing date: 14 June 2019 (midday)

Interview date: w/c 24 June 2019 (exact dates to be confirmed)

Please send your application quoting reference Communications Coordinator (state the location) to recruitment@livingstreets.org.uk

If the candidate pack is required in an alternative format please contact Living Streets at recruitment@livingstreets.org.uk or 020 7377 4900.

Strictly no agencies.

CVs will not be accepted.

Download Application Documents[:cy]Living Streets wants to create a walking nation, where everybody has the chance to gain from the health and social benefits this simple act can bring. Walking is also a vital ingredient of successful communities. Walkable towns and cities are often more vibrant socially and economically. Living Streets manages innovative national projects, working with schools, communities and workplaces to encourage more people to walk short journeys.

They are looking for two creative and confident communications professionals to join our dynamic Policy and Communications team at Living Streets, one based in Scotland and one in Wales. As part of the team, you’ll play a key role in helping us strengthen the voice for walking and ensuring our message is heard in Wales. You will be a member of the Policy and Communications department and work day to day with the Living Streets Cymru team.

To excel in this role, you’ll need to be organised, collaborative and resourceful and have a good understanding of a variety of communications channels specific to Scotland and Wales. You’ll work closely with the wider policy and communications, project delivery and commercial teams and play a central role in communicating the impact we’re having in their work throughout Wales. Your role will involve ensuring all communications in Wales are on brand and impact is reflected in the Welsh media. For Wales, fluency in writing and speaking in the Welsh language is a must. You will also help to raise profile throughout Wales via smaller, targeted communications, projects and wider stakeholder engagement.

Salary range: £26,519 to £33,513 per annum pro rata

Location: Cardiff

Hours: 17.5 hours per week (over 3 days a week)

Contract: Fixed term contract for 18 months from the start date

Closing date: 14 June 2019 (midday)

Interview date: w/c 24 June 2019 (exact dates to be confirmed)

Please send your application quoting reference Communications Coordinator (state the location) to recruitment@livingstreets.org.uk

If the candidate pack is required in an alternative format please contact Living Streets at recruitment@livingstreets.org.uk or 020 7377 4900.

Strictly no agencies.

CVs will not be accepted.

Download Application Documents[:]

NUS Placements for Good – Take on a Student this Summer

[:en]Take on a Placement Student this Summer     

Be part of the National Union of Students’ new programme – Placements for Good.

Do you want to be part of a new and exciting pilot programme? Work with university level students and increase capacity to progress sustainability.

NUS are looking for forward thinking organisations who want to work with university level students for social, environmental and economic benefit. Join a network of organisations working to enhance partnership working with universities whilst exploring potential to make a positive impact through their work.

They will:

  • Take away the hassle of recruitment and ensure you are partnered with talented and highly motivated students
  • Support you and your placement student before (with pre-placement training), during and after the placement to make this a valuable opportunity for all
  • Work with you to design a programme of work that supports your organisation’s core business as well as increasing your capacity to progress the sustainability (environmental and ethical) impacts of your work.

Placement for Good works with local charities, public sector organisations and businesses to empower students from all backgrounds to innovate and progress sustainability through meaningful work placements. They are looking for organisations like yourselves to support this vision whilst benefiting from the fantastic contributions’ students can offer.

In 2019, they are working with Solent University Southampton, University Centre South Devon and University of Wales Trinity Saint David’s.

 

  • Placements to commence summer 2019
  • Applications open now

 

Use this link to access an overview of the programme, how it works and what it aims to achieve.

To register, please visit: http://forgood.nus.org.uk/placements

For more information or to discuss this further, get in touch with Meg – Senior Project Officer, Education for Sustainable Development: meg.baker@nus.org.uk

 You may also be interested in Dissertations for Good, here is an overview of membership for your information.

If you would like to talk further, please direct any questions to Meg (meg.baker@nus.org.uk)

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Womenspire 2019 – call for nominations

[:en]Womenspire recognises women’s achievements in every aspect of life, from personal achievements to outstanding contribution.

Chwarae Teg want to hear about as many remarkable women from across the nation as possible, so if you know an inspirational women, please nominate her today!

Not sure how to nominate? They’ve written some handy top tips to help you out.

Top tips!

Deadline for nominations is Thursday 14 March.

Categories:

[:cy]Mae elusen cydraddoldeb rhywiol flaenllaw Cymru yn dathlu llwyddiannau menywod o bob cefnir a chyfnod mewn bywyd ar hyd a lled Cymru.

Mae Chwarae Teg am glywed am gymaint o fenywod anhygoel o bob rhan o’r wlad â phosib, felly os ydych chi’n nabod menyw ysbrydoledig, enwebwch hi heddiw!

Ddim yn siŵr sut i enwebu? Dyma ambell air o gyngor i’ch rhoi ar ben ffordd.

 Cynghorion defnyddiol!

Dydd Iau 14 Mawrth yw’r dyddiad cau ar gyfer enwebiadau

Y categorïau:

 

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