Transport

Roll out the green carpet: Wales’ Sustainable Academy Awards are back!

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A newly established awards ceremony celebrating Wales’ burgeoning sustainability and green energy sectors is back for its second year, Cynnal Cymru and RenewableUK Cymru have announced.

After the success of the inaugural event last year, the two organisations confirmed that the event will be now be an annual celebration of the excellent work being done by people and organisations across Wales. It will be held again at Principality Stadium, the low carbon home of Welsh Rugby,  on Thursday November 28th, 2019.

The Sustainable Academy is an exciting new initiative, founded by Cynnal Cymru and RenewableUK Cymru to bring together expertise from across the sustainability and green energy sectors in Wales. The awards, which span community, public and private sectors, celebrate sustainability and low carbon energy excellence, innovation and leadership across Wales; all the more relevant within the backdrop of a climate emergency.

Wales & West Utilities has confirmed it will resume its headline sponsorship of the event with Welsh Government and EDF renewable also returning as category sponsors.

Mari Arthur, Director of Cynnal Cymru, said:

“The Awards are my favourite event each year as we celebrate the voluntary commitments of community groups, individuals that champion initiatives through their own passion, and organisations that have made corporate decisions to do things better! Each and every finalist is delivering the Well-being of Future Generations and Environment Acts, from the ground up”.

 

Rhys Jones, Head of RenewableUK Cymru, said:

“How we deal with averting climate change comes down to taking affirmative action right here in Wales. The quality and level of interest we’ve seen in this event from the get-go shows that individuals, communities and businesses across Wales are mainstreaming sustainability as never before, and in ways which deliver significant direct and indirect benefits. As for the venue, it’s used to hosting world-leading acts so no doubt our award winners should feel right at home!” 

 

The nine categories are:

Sustainability Champion
Outstanding Renewable Energy Project
Sustainable Space
Sustainable Business
Sustainable Innovation in the Public Sector
Sustainable Community
Innovation in Sustainable Procurement or Supply Chain
Outstanding Social Enterprise
Sustainable Education or Training

Further information about entry criteria is on the Sustainable Academy Awards website:  www.sustainableacademy.wales, together with details of how to enter.  Entries should be submitted by midnight on Sunday 15 September. Three entries per category will be shortlisted to be put to the public vote. These votes will be added to the results from a panel of independent judges to decide the winners. The judges’ decision is final. Shortlisted entries will be informed shortly after the closing date and winners will be announced at the awards ceremony on 29 November 2018 in the Principality Stadium.

There are still opportunities to sponsor categories and various aspects of the event. To find out more details about what is available, please contact Lynsey Jackson on 029 2043 1746 or email lynsey@cynnalcymru.com

 


 

About Renewable UK Cymru

Renewable UK Cymru is a membership organisation promoting clean energy and sustainable infrastructure.  We make our members more successful, reduce barriers for community energy projects and engage with the public, Welsh Government and stakeholders.

 

About Cynnal Cymru

Cynnal Cymru – Sustain Wales is the leading organisation for Sustainable Development in Wales. Our mission is to make Wales a low carbon, resource efficient, healthy, just and prosperous society, thriving in balance with the natural ecosystems that support it. We facilitate the talent, skills and innovation of our people through our consultancy services, our events and training. We enable individuals, organisations and businesses in Wales to deliver measurable change and become leaders and pioneers for a better world.[:]

nextbike at Sustain Wales summit

[:en]An Introduction to ‘Active Travel’ sponsor, nextbike

As a European market leader and bike sharing pioneer, nextbike is making cycling an integral part of urban mobility, leading the cycling revolution in more than 200 cities across the world, including Dubai, Berlin, Pittsburgh, Cardiff and Warsaw.

For over 14 years it has developed reliable and flexible bike share systems and established them as a form of local public transport on equal footing with buses and rail.

nextbike UK launched in Bath in 2014 and has since expanded across the UK into several towns and cities, encouraging over 215,000 users to opt for sustainable travel in their work commutes and leisure activities. The Cardiff scheme, which celebrates its one-year anniversary on May 25th, is one of the largest schemes in the UK, with 600 bikes and 73 docks on the ground as well as 40,000 active users across the city.

Krysia Solheim, managing director of nextbike UK, began her career as a climate change and sustainable transport consultant for the City of New Haven after receiving a BSc in Environmental Science with minors in Arabic, Spanish, and Chinese from the University of Arizona and a Masters of Environmental Management from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

She then went on to manage nextbike Inc in North America, before moving to the UK, where she continues to be passionate about championing sustainable travel and the many health and environmental benefits it brings via various nextbike schemes and collaborations.

In her time as nextbike UK’s managing director, Krysia – along with her team –  has expanded the firm’s Cardiff scheme and launched schemes at both the University of Brunel and in the West Midlands. Its Stirling, Milton Keynes and Glasgow schemes are also scheduled to expand later this year. The company has also collaborated with other sustainable travel companies to give its customers more accessible options than ever.

Krysia will be in attendance at the Sustain Wales Summit 2019 on the Active Travel panel to give her valuable insight into the world of sustainable travel and what the future looks like for the UK’s leading bike share firm.

 

Are you travelling into the city for the Sustain Wales Summit next week?

Why not arrive at the Principality Stadium in sustainable style with nextbike UK!

Download the nextbike UK app, tap in code 251025 before your journey to claim 2-hours free cycling* and we’ll see you there!

*One per person. 2-hour code is valid until 20 hours after redeeming.[:]

Cardiff Public Sector Organisations sign Healthy Travel Charter

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Fourteen leading public sector organisations based in Cardiff signed the newly developed Healthy Travel Charter, committing themselves to supporting and encouraging their staff and visitors to travel in a sustainable way to and from their sites.

Through fourteen ambitious actions, the charter promotes walking, cycling, public transport and ultra-low emission vehicle use. The actions include establishing a network of sustainable travel champions, developing targeted communications campaigns for staff, offering and promoting the cycle to work scheme and increasing the availability of video-conferencing for meetings to reduce the number of journeys staff need to make across sites.

Between them, the organisations will commit to reducing the proportion of journeys commuting to and from work made by car from 62% to 52%, increasing the proportion of staff cycling weekly to and from work from 14% to 23%, and increase the proportion of vehicles used during the day which are plug-in hybrid or pure electric from 1% to 3% by 2022.

Organisations which signed the charter at a launch event at Cardiff City Hall were Cardiff Council, Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, Natural Resources Wales, South Wales Fire and Rescue, South Wales Police, HM Prison and Probation, Welsh Government, National Assembly for Wales, Sport Wales, Public Health Wales, HM Revenue & Customs, National Museum for Wales, Welsh Ambulance, and the Office of the Future Generations Commissioner. Together, these organisations employ over 33,000 members of staff in the city of Cardiff, whom they will be encouraging to make a healthy and sustainable change to the way they travel.

Air pollution in parts of Cardiff exceeds EU legal limits, increasing the risk to health, with road transport responsible for around 80% of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) measured at the roadside. Long-term effects of air pollution include increased rates of lung disease, cardiovascular disease and cancer. By working together with a view to the long-term, public sector organisations in the City aim to increase the proportion of journeys made to and from workplaces which are sustainable, reducing the impact on the environment and health of people in Cardiff for current and future generations. The public sector in Cardiff employs almost one in three adults in the City.

Cllr Huw Thomas, Leader of Cardiff Council and Chair of Cardiff Public Services Board said “We are delighted that members of Cardiff PSB, along with other public sector organisations in the City, are joining together to make this important series of pledges to support people to travel more sustainably in our City. As a Council we are committed to cleaning the air in Cardiff and are currently consulting on our Clean Air Strategy, which includes measures to improve the active travel infrastructure in the City and reduce emissions from public transport.”

Maria Battle, Chair of Cardiff and Vale UHB and Vice-Chair of the Public Services Board said “Increasing the number of journeys made on foot, by bike and by public transport, is vital to improving the health of citizens in Cardiff, and reducing dangerous air pollution. The Health Board fully supports the Charter and is in the process of expanding our popular Park and Ride service for University Hospital Wales, and will shortly introduce a similar service for University Hospital Llandough.”

For more information on the Charter please visit the Keeping Cardiff Moving website.[:]

The Future of Mobility and the Sustain Wales Summit

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The ‘Future of mobility: urban strategy’ outlines the UK government’s approach to maximising the benefits from transport innovation in cities and towns. It sets out the principles that will guide government’s response to emerging transport technologies and business models.

The strategy also contains details of the next steps for the government’s Future of mobility grand challenge.

Alongside the strategy, the Department for Transport (DfT) has published the summary of responses to its Future of mobility call for evidence.

Although not overly relevant to us here in Wales from a policy point of view, there are lots of lessons to be learned on the future of mobility and issues of air quality, active travel and the South Wales metro area to be discussed at the Sustain Wales Summit. It can be used to look at the problems surrounding current transport trends and ideas for the future including case studies.

The document states the below definitions which may be useful for those attending our summit:

Active travel: The terms ‘active travel’ and ‘walking and cycling’ are used in this document
to encompass a range of methods of active mobility, including trips made by wheelchair,
mobility scooters, adapted cycles and e-bikes.

Car clubs (sometimes known as car-sharing): Car clubs use electronic systems to
provide customers unattended access to cars for short-term rental, often by the hour.
Business models can be categorised into round-trips, where the vehicle must be returned
to its home station, and flexible, which allows one-way trips. Vehicles may be owned by
individuals and lent out on a peer-to-peer basis via an intermediary platform, or form part of
a fleet owned by a single organisation.

Demand responsive transport: A flexible service that provides shared transport in response to requests from users specifying desired locations and times of pickup and delivery. Dial-a-ride services scheduled through next day or advance bookings are a traditional example.

Dynamic demand responsive transport: More recent applications of demand responsive transport seek to work dynamically, adjusting routes in real time to accommodate new pickup requests often made minutes in advance.

Fractional ownership: An ownership model that involves a group of people purchasing or
leasing a good (such as a vehicle) and splitting the costs.

Micromobility: The use of small mobility devices, designed to carry one or two people, or
‘last mile’ deliveries. E-scooters and e-bikes are examples.

Mobility as a Service: The integration of various modes of transport along with
information and payment functions into a single mobility service. Recent services that
allow customers to purchase monthly subscription packages giving them access to public
transport and private taxi and bike hire schemes are an example.

Ride-hailing: Ride-hailing services use smartphone apps to connect paying passengers
with licensed taxi drivers or private hire vehicle operators who provide rides for profit.
Ride-sharing (sometimes known as car-pooling): Formal or informal sharing of rides
between unlicensed drivers and passengers with a common or similar journey route.

Ride-sharing platforms charge a fee for bringing together drivers and passengers. Drivers share trip costs with passengers rather than making a profit.

Shared mobility: Transport services and resources that are shared among users, either
concurrently or one after another. Public transport, or mass transit, as well as newer models
such as car-sharing, bike-sharing and ride-sharing, are all types of shared mobility.

Current UK Car Statistics

·         74% of adults have a driving license (80% of men and 69% of women)

·         76% of households have access to a car (35% having two or more)

·         61% of all personal trips are made by car (78% of personal trip mileage)

·         85% of people travel by car at least once a week

·         87% of people agree that they need to own a car in their current lifestyle

·         There are six cars for every ten people in the UK but the average car is unused 96% of the time.

·         Parking spaces occupy around 15-30% of a typical urban area

 

Air and Noise Pollution

Air pollution remains the top environmental risk to human health in the UK. It is worse in towns and cities and road transport accounts for 80% of nitrogen oxide concentrations at the roadside. The social cost of sleep disturbance, annoyance, and not to mention health impacts such as heart attacks, strokes and dementia from noise pollution was estimated at £7-10 billion in 2010.

 

Congestion

The time lost as a result of congestion costs the UK economy approximately £2billion a year before we consider the serious environmental costs of driving that is not fuel-efficient in stop-start traffic.

 

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Transport is the largest emitter of greenhouse gases in the UK, accounting for 27% of all emissions (road transport accounting for 91% of these emissions).

 

Health Issues

The lack of physical activity due to modern lifestyles and reliance on personal cars is a cause of obesity. Around 60% of adults in Wales are overweight or obese, with the UK currently having the highest obesity levels in Western Europe.[:]

The 2019 Summit Discussion: Putting the Citizen at the Heart of Urban Travel

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SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT AND MOBILITY

PUTTING THE CITIZEN AT THE HEART OF URBAN TRAVEL

09 MAY 2019 | 09:15 – 16:00 | CARDIFF

We are now gathering the resources for our fourth annual Sustain Wales Summit. We have devoted considerable effort in recent years to gather and focus expertise on the future of the car and road transport in general. We recognise the important, positive role that the car has played in our economic and social history, and we realised that people would not give up their cars easily, even though they are now associated with major environmental and health problems.

It has become apparent that our relationship with the car has to change: this conclusion is drawn by a number of organisations and experts – see IWA Decarbonising Transport in Wales Report for example. Our work on vulnerable customers and marginalised communities has focused our attention on the need to ensure that marginalised communities in Wales don’t lose out as transport decarbonises.

In the future, for several reasons, car ownership must and will decline. So the less well-off and those furthest from the economic centres have to be factored into the development of exciting new integrated transport systems. Meanwhile, it is often the less well-off, the youngest and oldest who suffer from polluted air while we delay the transition to low emission transport.

So our 2019 summit, building on our track record of work on road transport since 2016, will gather expertise to examine social justice and the needs of citizens in the evolving, integrated, low emission transport ecosystem that we all hope Wales will soon enjoy.

 

The summit will be separated into three categories and we will shortly announce exciting speakers to share learning on the below themes:

AIR QUALITY

Healthy travel, healthy communities

·         Setting the scene: the case for clean air

·         Low emission transport alternatives to the car

·         Clean air innovations

 

ACTIVE TRAVEL

Changing the way we move around our towns and cities

·         Integrating active travel

·         Mobility Credits

·         Active travel in the workplace

 

SOUTH WALES METRO AREA

Creating opportunity and delivering well-being

·         Integrated transport systems

·         Reaching all communities

·         Car clubs / shared mobility

 

Tickets

Tickets are now available and you can book via Ticketsource.

MEMBERS £50 plus VAT | EARLY BIRD £65 plus VAT  | NON MEMBERS £90 plus VAT 

 

Support the Summit

Cynnal Cymru works closely with our event sponsors and partners to bring together an exciting calendar of events throughout the year.

Our events typically offer a range of speaking and promotional opportunities, before during and after the event as well as a chance to showcase your organisation to a high profile audience.

If you would are interested in sponsoring and/ or speaking at this years’ Summit, please get in contact with Rhodri Thomas on 029 2043 1713[:]

Opportunities in Low Emission Transport and Mobility

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In February, Cynnal Cymru worked in partnership with Jacobs to deliver two major events for the Welsh Government. The objective of these Welsh Government funded events was to enable and motivate public sector professionals to speed up the transition to a low carbon, low emission transport system in Wales, with a particular focus on road transport and alternatives to private car ownership.

Delegates received information on SMART and vehicle technology, sources of funding, and examples that show how action can be taken that benefits the organisation, citizens, the local economy, and the environment.

A mixture of presentations, displays, demonstrations and surgeries enabled public sector professionals to learn from peers, industry, advisory organisations, government, and social enterprises.

The good news is that many of our public bodies in Wales are ambitious to decarbonise their own transport assets and want to help others to do so. Some, like Swansea Council, have moved beyond aspiration and are already running ultra-low emission vehicles. The technology is available and the whole life costs are persuasive. Electric, hydrogen and bio-gas options are available for public bodies but they were cautioned by experts to take time, do the research, analyse current service delivery before making any decisions. The right vehicle and the right power source needs to be chosen to fit the job. Effort needs to be made to ensure staff understand how to operate the new technology and are ready to embrace change.

The conferences also addressed the issues of public transport and equality of opportunity. Neil Lewis used the occasion of the Cardiff conference to announce that partners within Community Energy Wales are launching a co-operative to ensure that a network of chargers are established across Wales that will bring revenue to communities and make use of local renewable energy sources, where available.

Evidence was presented that experiences of electric vehicles in the work place have the potential to make it six times more likely that people will switch to electric for private domestic use. A wide range of funds are available for home-based charging and for electrifying public transport. Cardiff for example will benefit from 36 new electric buses that were purchased through UK government funding.

We also heard a persuasive argument in favour of compressed natural bio-gas as a fuel. This still produces greenhouse gasses but the amounts are less than fossil fuels and as the gas (methane) is derived from waste, it is part of a shorter term carbon cycle and not adding geological carbon to the atmosphere.

In addition to speakers and workshops, there were also vehicles on display and available for test drives. Both the Wrexham and Cardiff events had a real buzz about them and people were vigorously discussing practical options for removing fossil fuels from public transport, fleet and service vehicles as well as new models to reduce the reliance on the private car for commuting and business trips.[:]

Opportunities in Low Carbon Transport

In February 2019, Cynnal Cymru worked in partnership with Jacobs to deliver two major events for the Welsh Government. The objective of these Welsh Government funded events was to enable and motivate public sector professionals to speed up the transition to a low carbon, low emission transport system in Wales, with a particular focus on road transport and alternatives to private car ownership.

Delegates received information on SMART and vehicle technology, sources of funding, and examples that show how action can be taken that benefits the organisation, citizens, the local economy, and the environment.

A mixture of presentations, displays, demonstrations and surgeries enabled public sector professionals to learn from peers, industry, advisory organisations, government, and social enterprises.

The good news is that many of our public bodies in Wales are ambitious to decarbonise their own transport assets and want to help others to do so. Some, like Swansea Council, have moved beyond aspiration and are already running ultra-low emission vehicles. The technology is available and the whole life costs are persuasive. Electric, hydrogen and bio-gas options are available for public bodies but they were cautioned by experts to take time, do the research, analyse current service delivery before making any decisions. The right vehicle and the right power source needs to be chosen to fit the job. Effort needs to be made to ensure staff understand how to operate the new technology and are ready to embrace change.

The conferences also addressed the issues of public transport and equality of opportunity. Neil Lewis used the occasion of the Cardiff conference to announce that partners within Community Energy Wales are launching a co-operative to ensure that a network of chargers are established across Wales that will bring revenue to communities and make use of local renewable energy sources, where available.

Evidence was presented that experiences of electric vehicles in the workplace have the potential to make it six times more likely that people will switch to electric for private domestic use. A wide range of funds are available for home-based charging and for electrifying public transport. Cardiff for example will benefit from 36 new electric buses that were purchased through UK government funding.

We also heard a persuasive argument in favour of compressed natural bio-gas as a fuel. This still produces greenhouse gases but the amounts are less than fossil fuels and as the gas (methane) is derived from waste, it is part of a shorter term carbon cycle and not adding geological carbon to the atmosphere.

In addition to speakers and workshops, there were also vehicles on display and available for test drives. Both the Wrexham and Cardiff events had a real buzz about them and people were vigorously discussing practical options for removing fossil fuels from public transport, fleet and service vehicles as well as new models to reduce the reliance on the private car for commuting and business trips.

In 2016 we held our first seminar on the future of the car. We followed this in 2017 with a specific focus on the future of the car in Cardiff and in 2018 with a major event that looked at the challenges facing Wales as a whole if it is to transition to an ultra-low emission transport economy.

Also in 2018 we supported the Green Fleet Cymru event.

We are continuing to work with Jacobs, Welsh Government and other partners to promote understanding of ultra-low emission transport and to catalyse action to develop the markets and infrastrucutre for electric, hybrid and hydrogen vehicles.

Our contribution to this process is to broker collaboration between the public sector, the automotive sector, energy suppliers and communities, and to support ever wider engagement and communication of the challenges and opportunities of ultra-low emission vehicles.

(Electric) Car Future Wales

In Wales, transport is a major (and growing) contributor to climate change. We need to clean up transport as fast as possible. BEIS figures for Wales (Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy, 2017), show that transport accounted for around 25% of energy consumption in Wales during 2015 and 13% of all emissions. In the UK as a whole, BEIS data shows transport is responsible for about 26% of all emissions.

Decarbonising our transport sector is not only vital for the health of our planet, but also the well-being of citizens. Several areas in Wales suffer from dangerous and illegal levels of air pollution caused largely by road transport, with the most vulnerable in our society (including children and the elderly) particularly at risk. Air pollution contributes to around 2,000 deaths per year in Wales (6% of total deaths).

Electric vehicles (EVs) are part of the decarbonising solution but they still have pollution impacts. For example, a significant amount of particulate matter (airborne pollution particles) come from brake and tyre wear and EVs will contribute to this even though their direct emissions from fuel consumption are zero. There is also considerable embedded energy in the form of extracted minerals, steel, and plastic in each vehicle that needs to be recovered at the end of the vehicle’s working life. EVs can however make a significant contribution to lowering Wales’ carbon emissions, and improve air quality, if they are recharged from renewable energy sources.

Electric vehicles are not a panacea. Moving to a nation where ‘active travel’ is the default choice for all, followed by public transport, then shared mobility and finally, single occupancy car journeys, should be Wales’ main aim as this would deliver multiple benefits.

In a low carbon, healthier Wales, where there is greater equality of opportunity, EVs will be part of the transport mix, however. The growth in ownership of ultra-low emission vehicles in Wales currently lags behind other parts of the UK but is comparable to other rural and post-industrial areas. With any new technology, uptake is initially slow and a minority of enthusiastic pioneers struggle to operate it when there is minimal support infrastructure. This has certainly been true of the electric car in Wales. Owners of electric cars are motivated by a commitment to low carbon, or by possession of the means to make the technology pay (or both). It makes sense for example, for a family on higher than average income with cash to spare, living in a detached house with a drive, to put solar PV on the roof and a charge point on the drive. There is less motivation for anyone living in a terraced house with no means of installing an on-street charger, assuming they could afford the roof PV panels and higher upfront purchase/rental costs of the vehicle in the first place.

The Welsh Government has committed a small but significant sum of £2 million to enable a network of electric charging points along main roads throughout Wales. The focus of the £2 million is to help provide a charging network along/near Wales’ trunk road network. These include roads not registered as part of the Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) – in other words, a more far-reaching impact. At Cynnal Cymru’s Car Futures Wales conference in February 2018, there was consensus that public money should be spent where it will produce a net economic benefit: a charging network should therefore support the Government’s aims on active travel, decarbonisation, health, and equality of opportunity. As a nation, we should see electric cars as one of many tools to help us deliver the Well-being Goals. In practice, this would mean public charging infrastructure at park and rides, hospitals, rail heads, and tourist destinations.

The recent Economic Action Plan committed to making all taxis and buses in Wales zero-carbon within 10 years. This is a great start, but, given the lower running costs of EVs, why not electrify the entire public sector fleet? This has the additional benefit of making people more familiar with EVs, and more likely to switch themselves. Swansea council has recently taken the plunge by purchasing 40 Peugeot electric vans and installing 18 charge points.

Mid and West Wales Fire Service has two hydrogen cars and twelve electric vehicles with seventeen charge points. They are working with Natural Resources Wales and others to share charging infrastructure. Such confident investment in low carbon transport is rare however. Local authorities have to make bolder decisions about electric vehicles and work with the Government or else Wales risks falling behind other parts of the UK as the economy transitions to an electric fleet.

Given the current financial constraints faced by local authorities, a council may wish to consider a variety of ways that it can support a transition to low carbon road transport. The following were suggested by delegates at the Car Futures Wales conference;

  • Congestion charges and differentiated road access: for example, EVs could be permitted to use bus lanes or introduce Low Emissions Zones where polluting vehicles would be banned or fined.
  • Workplace parking levies with concessions for ultra-low emission vehicles.
  • Building standards and planning: the Welsh Government/Councils could require all new housing developments and shopping centres to have EV charge points designed in.
  • Investment in charging infrastructure: this should focus on the current black spots in mid Wales which make traveling north-south very difficult. This could alleviate range anxiety.
  • The Scottish Government is introducing a special innovation fund, designed to find solutions to charging for people living in tenement blocks or high rises. Welsh Government needs to find a similar way to ensure people who live in terraces and flats are also supported to switch to EVs.
  • It also makes sense to install charge points at modal interchanges (e.g. train stations, park and rides) to connect with public transport.
  • Public charging bays are vulnerable to being blocked by vehicles that stay beyond the charge period, or even by non-electric vehicles using them as parking bays. We will need to create a new regime of by-laws, and evolve a new culture of road etiquette

Charging availability is likely to affect vehicle purchase decisions and could be a catalyst for a market change. Visible infrastructure also supports a wider debate around sustainability, air quality and decarbonisation. Many local authorities in the UK are currently grappling with the challenge of improving air quality through a charging system for access to urban centres. Providing free entry or similarly, free parking to EVs is a provocative statement. Ultimately however, no authority wants to replace congestion by one type of vehicle with congestion by another so such concessions to EVs are likely to be a short-term response to the specific issue of air quality. The IWA report “Decarbonising Transport in Wales” calls for a change in the culture of Wales and a move away from reliance on the car; although it accepts that electric cars will still have a role to play in rural communities where local, community-owned renewables could be linked to charging infrastructure. The report argues that reducing the numbers of cars on the road should be a priority for all levels of government.

Limits on residential charging infrastructure, EV congestion and the high up-front cost of ownership may slow the uptake of private electric cars in Wales even as legislation makes owning a fossil fuel vehicle more expensive. Mobility as a service may then become an increasingly attractive alternative. In this model, private citizens choose not to own a car but instead have a contract or service agreement with a supplier such as a car club or taxi on demand. There are signs that mobility as a service is growing in popularity in cities and amongst young adults. With its wealth of renewable energy sources and a modest growth in community-owned renewable energy supply, Wales has an opportunity to link the need for mobility to a social business model and the equality of opportunity this offers. Specifically, this means that communities that own their own energy supply could also operate a not-for-profit car club. This could prove significant in rural towns and villages if changes in urban centres, driven by the necessity to improve air quality, push the market against diesel and older petrol vehicles.

Energy suppliers such as SP Energy Networks (SPEN) caution that we need to think about new ways of storing and moving energy. They ask us to consider what would happen if every one of 1.4 million domestic customers in their region plugged in an electric vehicle when they got home from work. While this may seem far-fetched, the forecasted growth in global EV ownership has increased by 500% in one year. Addressing the Car Futures Wales conference in February 2018, Liam O’Sullivan, SP Energy Networks District Manager for North Wales, shared SPEN’s estimate that investment of between £300 million to £2.2 billion is required to facilitate a 100% EV uptake across the Scottish Power Manweb area, depending on which scenario becomes the reality.

Momentum is growing for a rapid decarbonisation of transport in Wales. From analysis by the IWA to an increasing frequency of events held by Cynnal Cymru, local government, The Automotive Forum and the Welsh Government, the message is clear: decarbonisation of transport is essential, possible, and replete with opportunity. On the 7th and 21st of February 2019, Jacobs, with the support of Cynnal Cymru will stage two major conferences for the public sector on behalf of the Welsh Government. At these events, we will dispel myths, provide details on funding, present examples of ‘how to do it’ and give public sector professionals the opportunity to learn from each other and make important connections with industry specialists. “Your next car will be electric,” is an increasingly used phrase but while we wait for the fruits of the collaboration between Transport For Wales and the new rail franchisee, and initiatives such as the Cardiff Council transport green paper, perhaps we should start using the phrase, “this is the last car I’ll own!”

Cardiff Council Transport and Clean Air Green Paper

From January to July 2018 we worked intensively with Cardiff Council on their Transport and Clean Air Green Paper. We were tasked with conducting research to inform the drafting of the paper, and helping with consultation once it was published.

Desk-top research looked at reports compiled within the last five years, emerging trends in transport, and the activity in other cities around the world. Seminars and conferences included Cynnal Cymru’s 2016 “Future Car:diff” event, “Car Futures Wales”, and the Innovate UK “Transport Challenges” workshop. Interviews took place with Innovate UK’s Transport Systems Catapult, Arup, Jacobs, The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, Living Streets, and Cardiff Civic Society.

As drafts progressed, a team of Council officers and Cynnal Cymru staff was formed under the leadership of Cabinet Member for Transport, Councillor Wild. This team began to blend existing Cardiff Council transport research and strategies with new information gleaned from the research. The team included representatives from the Transport department, Economic Development, City Services, Shared Regulatory Services, Research and Customer Services, Policy, and Operations, and was chaired by the Director of City Operations. The end result ensured innovative practices from other cities was combined with existing strategic and policy commitments and an awareness of emerging trends to meet the specific needs of Cardiff.

Following publication, we worked with the Transport Team, Customer Services, The Cardiff Research Centre and FOR Cardiff to undertake a variety of consultations events and communications. These included an event for businesses and targeted engagement of specific locations.

Developing a sustainable transport approach for Cardiff

We have been very pleased to have been of service to Cardiff Council this year and have learned a great deal from the work, helping us to hone our skills and broaden our knowledge.

In February 2018 we facilitated a workshop for stakeholders of the Council’s transport team. They needed to consult with city centre businesses and citizen’s groups on proposed changes to the street scene and traffic flow in central Cardiff.

We helped our client develop a workshop approach to obtain the information they required, promoted the event to targeted individuals and organisations, and managed the task groups and discussions during the three hour long session in Cardiff’s Central Library. The team took the data gathered to help them design costed project work and reported that they were very happy with the level of stakeholder engagement, the workshop process and our management of time and discussion.

From January to July we have been working intensively with the Council on their Transport and Clean Air Green Paper. We were tasked with conducting research to inform the drafting of the paper, and helping with consultation once it was published.

Desk-top research looked at reports compiled within the last five years, emerging trends in transport, and the activity in other cities around the world. Seminars and conferences included Cynnal Cymru’s 2016 “Future Car:diff” event, “Car Futures Wales”, and the Innovate UK “Transport Challenges” workshop. Interviews took place with Innovate UK’s Transport Systems Catapult, Arup, Jacobs, The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, Living Streets, and Cardiff Civic Society.

Early drafts concentrated on innovative practices that were not already included in the existing Council Transport Strategy or the Cycling Strategy.

As drafts progressed, a team of Council officers and Cynnal Cymru staff was formed under the leadership of Cabinet Member for Transport, Councillor Wild. This team began to blend existing Cardiff Council transport research and strategies – material that had informed the previous Transport Strategy and the Cycling Strategy for example – with new information gleaned from the research. The team included representatives from the Transport department, Economic Development, City Services, Shared Regulatory Services, Research and Customer Services, Policy, and Operations, and was chaired by Andrew Gregory Director of City Operations. The end result ensured innovative practices from other cities was combined with existing strategic and policy commitments and an awareness of emerging trends to meet the specific needs of Cardiff.

Following publication, we worked with the Transport Team, Customer Services, The Cardiff Research Centre and FOR Cardiff to undertake a variety of consultations events and communications. These included an event for businesses and targeted engagement of specific locations.

In May, we helped the Council’s policy team to stage a presentation by the leaders of Cardiff’s Public Service Board.

This was to mark the milestone of the Cardiff Well-being Plan’s publication and consultation. At a city centre event, the leader of Cardiff Council, Huw Thomas, was joined by Maria Battle – Chair of the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board – and South Wales Police Commissioner, Alun Michael. We secured the contribution of Cardiff citizens who spoke about their experiences and hopes for the future. These stories related to education, youth services, Living Wage, health and social care. We provided the compere role for the event and managed the Q&A session as well as leading on the promotion, invitations and social media.

What We Have Learned

We now have a much deeper understanding of the way that local authorities work, particularly the relationship between officers and elected members within a given policy portfolio. This work has enabled us to broaden our knowledge of the sustainable development aspects of transport, and the dynamic relationship between road use, air quality, carbon emissions, road safety, health, technology and the economy. We have consolidated research, facilitation, presentation and communication skills, adding valuable experience to our core offer. We would be confident to take on similar work for new clients, working with them as partners, as we are continuing to do with Dwr Cymru-Welsh Water and others.

If you have communication, consultation and engagement needs and feel that we could help then contact lynsey@cynnalcymru.com

If you want help with research, analysis, facilitation and presentation of data, then contact rhodri@cynnalcymru.com

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