Carbon Literacy

22-25 March | Carbon Literacy Open Course

Join us for the next Carbon Literacy open course where you will learn about the links between human activity and climate change and develop the knowledge to enable you and your organisation to take action to reduce carbon emissions.

Who should attend?

Carbon Literacy works on the principle of peer-to-peer learning and encourages people to learn together, sharing knowledge and experiences along the way. The climate science is pitched for beginners but the approach to enabling and identifying positive action works for all abilities.

This course is suitable for those in a position to lead, organise or support others. This could be senior managers and teams leaders, board members or trustees, support workers or volunteers.

About distance learning

The majority of the course involves self-directed study through our new online learning platform. This will include suggested reading, links to further examples and research as well as links to videos to watch.

The course will also includes three interactive sessions with your course-tutor and fellow students.

  • Duration across one week
  • Self-directed study 4-6 hours
  • Facilitated sessions 4 hours

For more information and to book online, visit the new training section of our website or contact us at training@cynnalcymru.com

WHAT PREVIOUS ATTENDEES HAVE SAID: 

“Course was well delivered – good videos and supporting info”

“I gained a better understanding of climate change and what needs to be done NOW! Enjoyed the presentation and group work.”

“A good balance between presentation and group work. The tutor was likeable and engaging.”

“A valuable course that gave me all the tools I needed to disarm climate sceptics and convey the utter madness of inaction. Motivating and empowering, time truly well spent.”

COST AND BOOKING

Non members £95 plus VAT* per person plus £10 certification fee

Members £85 plus VAT* per person plus £10 certification fee


The Carbon Literacy Project

Carbon Literacy is a concept created in Manchester by Cooler Projects Ltd. and administered by the Carbon Literacy Trust.

Cynnal Cymru is the official partner in Wales for the award-winning Carbon Literacy Project.

In April 2020, Cynnal Cymru was further recognised as a Carbon Literacy Training Organisation – the first in Wales.

National Museum of Wales, Public Health Wales, Tai Ceredigion, Grwp Cynefin, Acuity Legal, Welsh Government, Trivallis, Cartrefi Cymunedol Gwynedd, Social Farms and Gardens are just some of the organisation that have benefited from our course.

It is now your chance to join a growing movement!

Climate Change – Definitions

Essential for All

We will now spend some more time exploring key climate change terminology and science. In this and the following three topics, you will be asked to download a short presentation covering the Basic Science of Climate Change.

In the presentation below we will cover: Climate relevant definitions:

Both versions are narrated. In order to hear the narration it is important that you download the presentation rather than view it online. If you download “The standard PowerPoint”, you will also find the script in the notes. Once you have watched the presentation, please move on to the next topic.

Over 400 People Carbon Literate in Wales!

What is The Carbon Literacy Project?

The Carbon Literacy Project offers everyone a day’s worth of Carbon Literacy learning, covering – climate change, carbon footprints, how you can do your bit, and why it’s relevant to you and your audience. The Project divides ‘everyone’ into three distinct audiences – those that live, those that work, and those that study. This allows every citizen to be offered Carbon Literacy learning in a way that has immediate meaning for them.

The Project delivers no training directly but works with a host of people and organisations from all walks of life, that all deliver training that is accredited against the Carbon Literacy Standard. The Project then assesses participant’s and certifies successful candidates with their own uniquely numbered Carbon Literacy certificate.

There is nothing else quite like The Carbon Literacy Project. This was recognised by the United Nations at the UN climate negotiations, COP21, in Paris in 2015, where the Project was awarded TAP100 status, – one of 100 projects worldwide recognised as Transformative Action Programmes, that could materially change the way we deal with climate change.

The Carbon Literacy Project has always been a massive collaborative project. It involves people and organisations from all sectors and walks of life working together and contributing time, materials and funding to advance understanding and action on climate change.

The Project is wholly owned by The Carbon Literacy Trust, a registered charity (No 1156722) established in 2013 to take responsibility for The Project in perpetuity, for the public good.

Where did it all begin?

A cross-sector collaboration developed a carbon reduction plan to make Manchester carbon neutral by 2038. The plan was backed by the local government, the Mayor of Manchester, businesses, universities, and community organisations who quickly recognised that in order for the plan to be successful, they needed a method of learning that enabled every individual in Manchester to take positive action in reducing their emissions. That solution is Carbon Literacy.

Where do we come into it?

We discovered the need for Carbon Literacy in Wales in 2016 after meeting with Claire Raisin, the then Director of Size of Wales, and Dave Coleman, the co-Director of The Carbon Literacy Project.

Exactly a year later, we delivered our first certified Carbon Literacy course for the Sustainability Hub of Public Health Wales and since then we have delivered Carbon Literacy training to over 400 people from all sectors and all parts of Wales.

In the three years that we have been delivering Carbon Literacy training, the project has grown enormously to become an international movement with over 16,000 individuals being trained across ten nations.

As the official partner of the Carbon Literacy Project in Wales, and the only Carbon Literacy training organisation that we are aware of, we’re immensely proud to be part of this movement but we also humbly recognise that the ethos of Carbon Literacy is one of sharing and co-operation.

The main course that we run is called “Carbon Literacy in the Workplace” but we also have a certified course for engineers and are developing ideas to engage more general communities whilst exploring the possibility of developing a course for unions as well.

Our approach is to engage with people largely on a sector basis, training some initial pioneer cohorts and subsequently supporting clients to develop their own courses for delivery in-house via a peer to peer cascade.

We proudly helped National Museum Wales start their journey to develop a dedicated course for the museum sector and connected them with museums in Manchester. 

Our biggest success however is enabling a consortium of 27 social housing providers to design Carbon Literacy training for their own sector which replicates what has been achieved in greater Manchester.

With support from Linc and the Carbon Literacy Project, we trained a pioneer cohort of 63 individuals and supported a course design team. A further 70 colleagues are now undergoing “train the trainer” with Manchester Metropolitan University and in January, the members will start cascading Carbon Literacy training to colleagues.

It’s an amazing achievement for 27 companies to agree to work with each other like this and there have already been reports from the consortium – known as Carbon Literacy Cartrefi Cymru or CLCC – on the impacts the training has had.

For example, Wales and West Housing reported that they are upgrading their fleet to electric vehicles as a direct result of its senior colleagues receiving Carbon Literacy training from us.

While we have been busy in Wales, the core organisation in Manchester has been even busier. It received funding from the UK Government’s BEIS department to develop a range of courses for public sector professional disciplines. It has already launched the Local Authority Toolkit, and Cardiff Council – who received initial training from us – is preparing to use it to train its staff.

Tim Gordon (Head of Communications and External Affairs at Cardiff Council) attended our carbon literacy training in 2019 and responded with: “A thoroughly fascinating and informative course which will open your eyes to the climate change debate – even if you thought you already knew all about it. It will really make you rethink the way we live life today”.

Tim and colleagues are currently receiving and analysing responses to the public consultation on their draft One Planet Cardiff Strategy: the Carbon Literacy training of all staff is an integral part of the One Planet Cardiff proposal. 

Meanwhile, Denbighshire County Council is training their senior management and elected members and we are helping them to develop a Carbon-lite e-learning course.

Newport Council and Monmouthshire Public Service Board are also preparing to initiate Carbon Literacy training with our support.

What’s next for us?

This month we will be running a session for Sustainable Development Co-ordinators Cymru, the network of sustainability professionals in public bodies across Wales. This group will be the first to use our new online learning platform as we convert to a more Covid proof model of learning.

The new website now enables anyone around the world to enrol themselves on any of our courses and undertake a combination of self-directed study with online tutor-led sessions. We will be adding dedicated client-focused courses to the site with a closed enrolment as well as continuing to add open courses that anyone can join.

Our experience with Carbon Literacy has led us to consider the parallels between the climate crisis and the nature crisis and explore whether the same learning approach can be applied to raise people’s awareness of the decline in biodiversity. 

The concept of ‘eco-literacy’ is not new but we think we are the first to apply the principles of Carbon Literacy to the challenge.

With the blessing of the Carbon Literacy project, therefore, we have designed a course that addresses the nature crisis following the Carbon Literacy criteria. The course enables group learning and problem solving with a focus on positive action while not hiding the severity of the threat posed by the erosion of natural systems and the extinction of species worldwide.

Participants will be aided in finding local, collaborative solutions to a global problem and to recognise the value of individual action. We aim to pilot the course in the new year and are pleased to have the support of a wide body of biodiversity professionals and interested groups.

Just like Manchester, Wales has its own carbon reductions plans and targets. With support from us, everyone who lives, works or studies in Wales can now become Carbon Literate and play their part in our national story of revival and renewal.

If you’d like to join our next open Carbon Literacy course please email training@cynnalcymru.com

The Carbon Literacy Project

The Carbon Literacy Project offers everyone a day’s worth of Carbon Literacy learning, covering – climate change, carbon footprints, how you can do your bit, and why it’s relevant to you and your audience. 

The Carbon Literacy Project offers everyone a day’s worth of Carbon Literacy learning, covering – climate change, carbon footprints, how you can do your bit, and why it’s relevant to you and your audience. 

The Project divides ‘everyone’ into three distinct audiences – those that live, those that work, and those that study. This allows every citizen to be offered Carbon Literacy learning in a way that has immediate meaning for them.

The Project delivers no training directly, but works with a host of people and organisations from all walks of life, that all deliver training that is accredited against the Carbon Literacy Standard. The Project then assesses participant’s and certifies successful candidates with their own uniquely numbered Carbon Literacy certificate.

Due to this ‘crowdsourced’ approach, working with everyone, from all walks of life, The Carbon Literacy Project is globally unique – there is nothing else quite like it anywhere. This was recognised by the United Nations at the UN climate negotiations, COP21, in Paris in 2015, where the Project was awarded TAP100 status, – one of 100 projects worldwide recognised as Transformative Action Programmes, that could materially change the way we deal with climate change.

The Carbon Literacy Project has, from its inception, always been a massive collaborative project. It involves people and organisations from all sectors and walks of life working together and contributing time, materials and funding to advance understanding and action on climate change. The Project is wholly owned by The Carbon Literacy Trust, a registered charity (No 1156722) established in 2013 to take responsibility for The Project in perpetuity, for the public good.

Carbon Literacy logo

Grasshopper Communications Takes First Steps in Becoming Carbon Literate

One of our members, Grasshopper Communications recently completed Carbon Literacy training with us. This is how director, Hannah Dineen feels the training has impacted the organisation to take action on climate change both internally and on a personal level…

Many of us may feel we care about the climate change emergency but feel overwhelmed about how much information is out there and how to take action to actually make a difference.

For me personally, having just attended Cynnal Cymru’s Carbon Literacy Training, I feel better equipped to take action to make a difference to reduce my carbon footprint and carbon offset.

So, we’re all aware the world is getting warmer and we’ve got a climate emergency. The NASA time machine has helped me to clearly visualise how the earth’s key climate indicators (sea ice, sea level, carbon dioxide and global temperature) have changed over my lifetime.

So how will this affect you and me?

Climate change is already happening before our eyes. Rainfall patterns are becoming increasingly unpredictable with a shift towards a ‘feast and famine’ regime. The potential for declining water availability and potential water scarcity is likely to have a negative affect on agricultural (crop or pasture) production resulting in food price spikes.

The floods in South Wales in February 2020 hit the poorest communities, many of whom lacked insurance to cover the cost of the wrecked belongings and struggling to pay for repairs.

Rising sea levels is threatening many of our flood defences.  Defending seaside towns and villages, roads and railways will prove costly and unsustainable. Natural Resources Wales are therefore exploring opportunities for nature based solutions and adaption to our coast.

Climate change is also changing the patterns of migratory birds and increasing pests and diseases. The RSPB has responded by exploring different management techniques.  The parts of the Ynyshir reserve in the Dyfi estuary has now been allowed to flood during high tides and storms, creating a much needed new marshland for the migrating birds.

So how can we make a difference? 

DRIVERS OF CLIMATE CHANGE

Our use of energy is one of the major contributors to climate change. We need to reduce our energy consumption and our reliance on fossil fuels. For starters, we could all switch to a green energy provider or invest in a community energy share offer.

The Welsh Government has set a target for 70% of Wales’ electricity to be generated by renewables by 2030. The Welsh Government report ‘Energy Generation in Wales : 2019’ shows positive signs towards meeting the target and estimates that 51% of electricity consumption comes from renewables.

Additionally, renewable energy projects bring co-benefits, for example Vattenfall’s Pen y Cymoedd wind farm in the South Wales Valleys, has supported over 100 local jobs and an annual investment of £1.8m to make a difference to the lives of local people.

The construction and running of buildings is a significant contributor to our carbon footprint. Whether it’s school, hospitals, offices or homes, the development sector is striving to achieve net zero buildings. We are looking forward to delivering communications on behalf of a collaboration of 68 partners, managed by Sero, that has just been awarded £7m of Welsh Government’s  Optimised Retrofit Funding to roll out the large scale decarbonisation of homes across Wales.

The Royal Town Planning Institute’s campaign ‘Plan the World We Need’ is calling on governments across the UK and Ireland to capitalise on the expertise of planners to achieve a sustainable, resilient and inclusive recovery and meet net-zero targets by 2050.

The recent Cynnal Cymru event, ‘Greening the Screen’ showcased how the film production industry is becoming more sustainable.  Arup’s recent research ‘A Screen New Deal’ shows that  an average tentpole film production generates 2,840 tonnes of CO2e, the equivalent amount absorbed by 3,709 acres of forest in a year.  The report recommends the industry strive to reuse materials, design sets for deconstruction and repurpose thus additionally contributing to the Circular Economy agenda.

Roger Williams from Joio Production spoke of how sustainability was put at the heart of producing the latest series of Bang on S4C.  Commitment to deliver positive sustainable actions resulted in removing paper cups from set, only printing call sheets on request, advocating the use of public transport and sourcing costumes from local charity shops.

Communities are equally coming together to act. The Edible Porthmadog project shows how residents and school children have reused old boats as planters for fruit and vegetables to provide local produce to local people.  The Llani Car Club provides its 27 members access to a car (including electric car).  The members have shared how it has helped them to reduce their car mileage, car share more and learn how to use public transport.  The Awel Co-op runs two wind turbines on Mynydd y Gwrhyd, 20 miles north of Swansea providing enough energy to supply over 2,500 homes.  The profits help tackle fuel poverty and develop other renewable energy projects.

So, pause for a moment.  Do you know what you are contributing to climate change?  Why not calculate your organisation’s emissions or calculate your carbon footprint as a household? If you want to know more, ‘How bad are bananas?’ by Mike Berners gives an invaluable and entertaining guide that shows just what effect everything has on carbon emissions, from a Google search to a plastic bag, from a flight to a volcano.

The carbon literacy training has spurred me on to act and embed carbon reduction into my daily lifestyle and encourage others to do the same.

Our next Carbon Literacy open course takes place from 14-17 December, and spaces are now open.

Visit: https://bit.ly/CC_CarbonLiteracy

Carbon Literacy Open Course

Introduction to Carbon Literacy

Carbon Literacy is:

“An awareness of the carbon dioxide costs and impacts of everyday activities and the ability and motivation to reduce emissions on an individual, community and organisational basis.”

The course

Duration

Across
one week

Facilitated Sessions

Tuesday and Thursday
4 hours

Self Directed Learning

Pre-course 1-2 hours
During 3-4 hours

Certification

Subject to successful completion

Planning for a Successful Learning Experience

We recommend a minimum of 4 hours of self-directed learning, including time to read articles, watch videos and complete assignments.

The course includes three virtual sessions with your course-tutor and fellow students. These sessions are essential to achieving your certification as well as providing a valuable opportunity to reflect on your learning and explore each topic in more depth.

To participate in the online facilitated sessions you need access to a computer or tablet with a mic (video camera optional) as well as access to Zoom video conferencing.

Checklist

You can explore the course below, and see what content is featured.

Cynnal Cymru becomes the first Carbon Literacy Training Organisation in Wales

In April 2020, Cynnal Cymru – Sustain Wales was recognised as the first Carbon Literacy Training Organisation (CLTO) in Wales. This accreditation is testament to Cynnal Cymru’s commitment to accelerating action on climate change by providing over 80 organisations with the training and support needed to reduce their carbon emissions.

The award-winning Carbon Literacy Project aims to give everyone a day’s worth of learning on the causes and consequences of climate change and the practical actions individuals can take in their home, workplaces and community to reduce carbon emissions. A globally unique project, it has been recognised by the UN as one of its 100 Transformative Action Programmes.

Cynnal Cymru has been the official partner of The Carbon Literacy Project since 2017, delivering accredited Carbon Literacy training across Wales to a variety of organisations including United Welsh, Cardiff Council, The National Museum of Wales, Public Health Wales, Community Housing Cymru, WCVA and many SMEs, charities and voluntary organisations.

In February 2020, Cynnal Cymru facilitated the creation of a consortium of 27 housing associations and social housing providers to launch ‘Carbon Literacy Cartrefi Cymru’.   The consortium will develop bespoke Carbon Literacy courses for the social housing sector and enable a network of trainers to cascade peer to peer learning throughout this sector. Consortium members have agreed in principal to support each other in order to realise the goal of a decarbonised social housing and care sector in Wales.

Sarah Hopkins, Director at Cynnal Cymru said:

One of Cynnal Cymru’s key objectives is to accelerate progress to a low carbon economy in Wales and we are really pleased to become the first accredited CLTO in Wales. Carbon Literacy training provides an effective combination of scientific understanding and ideas for practical action to give participants the confidence to take action in response to the climate emergency. It’s really positive to see an increased interest in this training and we are looking forward to providing a remotely delivered course from May 2020.

Rhodri Thomas, Principal Trainer said:

The Carbon Literacy Project continues to grow in Wales, with the Museum sector, Public Health and Social Housing all embracing the concept as a way to inform and empower the workforce to make rational and proportionate choices in their private lives while supporting the strategic goals of their organisations. Covid-19 provides an interesting challenge in terms of how we frame the climate change conversation and deliver training remotely but it’s more important than ever to ensure we tackle climate change to safeguard our future.

Dave Coleman, Managing Director and Co-founder of The Carbon Literacy Project said:

Cynnal Cymru has been pivotal in helping to disseminate the Carbon Literacy message across Wales, helping The Project reach and engage with a more diverse cross-section of the Welsh community than we could possibly achieved otherwise. We’re delighted to accredit Cynnal as a Carbon Literacy Training Organisation, and see it join the ranks of a select few organisations at the top of their game in developing and delivering Carbon Literacy training, and so far the only organisation in Wales to have done so.

Carbon Literacy Cartrefi Cymru

The CLCC consortium came together in 2019 in order to increase Carbon Literacy within their organisations. By working together they were able to pool money and resources to increase capacity and knowledge across the consortium.

CLCC has worked with 29 different RSLs and currently has 24 members across Wales, representing 128,539 homes.

Cynnal Cymru – Sustain Wales runs the secretariat for CLCC, organising meetings, holding funds for use by the consortium, providing support around Carbon Literacy and facilitating Community of Practice sessions for CLCC trainers.

CLCC 2022-2023 members


The current Chair of CLCC is Alice Milanese, Sustainability Manager at Valleys to Coast.

“We’ve done the [Carbon Literacy] training, it’s raised awareness and as a consequence, this has now happened. Would we be looking at electrifying our fleet this year? No. But we are. Would we be looking at half a million-pound investment to kickstart our carbon reduction plan. No. But we are. We are now re-procuring our energy to go to green renewables.”

Richard Mann, Deputy Chief Executive and Group Director Operations, United Welsh.

CLCC history

In October 2019 representatives from 16 different RSLs around Wales came together to learn more about The Carbon Literacy Project and hear a proposal to create a Carbon Literacy consortium of RSLs in Wales.

The delegates of this meeting edited the proposal which went back out to all RSLs in Wales. In January 2020 a meeting surrounding this proposal led to the creation of a Carbon Literacy consortium of 27 Welsh RSLs. The consortium was named Carbon Literacy Cartrefi Cymru (CLCC).

      • February 2020 – Phase I: rounds of Carbon Literacy training for member organisations delivered by Cynnal Cymru.
      • March 2020 – Lockdown. Training continues remotely with a new online course and the whole CLCC programme is moved online. 65 member organisation employees receive training and became Carbon Literate.
      • May 2020 – Phase II: 5 training experts from within the consortium work with Cynnal Cymru and Manchester Metropolitan to develop a customisable Carbon Literacy course for Welsh social housing.
      • October 2020 – Phase III: Each member organisation will have at least 2 members of staff trained as Carbon Literacy trainers by Manchester Metropolitan. They will be trained to deliver the courses developed in Phase II.
      • 2020 – onwards: Member organisations use their trainers to deliver Carbon Literacy training internally to staff and embed Carbon Literacy into their induction process. Cynnal Cymru are supporting this with facilitated Community of Practice sessions for trainers providing a space for cross organisational learning, support and Carbon Literacy course development.
      • March 202: Following feedback from consortium members and trainers, Version 2 of the Carbon Literacy course is completed in both English and Welsh, incorporating updated examples and a more streamlined and user-friendly format.
      • The future: CLCC are exploring collaboratively funding other projects to support decarbonisation, such as self-evaluation carbon footprint tools and a rollout of Carbon Literacy training for tenants

    Journey of Carbon Literacy

        • Deliver Carbon Literacy course
        • Trainer facilitates achievable but ambitious actions
        • Learner evidence forms are sent to The Carbon Literacy Project
        • The Carbon Literacy Project assesses whether a learner is Carbon Literate based on their evidence form
        • Carbon Literacy Champions within CLCC organisations should follow up on actions
        • Organisational behaviour change on climate change is accelerated

      If you would like to know more please contact:

      Fiona Humphreys, Carbon Literacy Cartrefi Cymru (CLCC) secretariat: fiona@cynnalcymru.com

      Luke Penny, Carbon Literacy Cartrefi Cymru (CLCC) coordinator: luke@cynnalcymru.com

      Can We Engineer Our Way to a Sustainable Future?

      Our Training Manager Rhodri Thomas was recently invited to give a talk to the Chartered Institution of Civil Engineers. He tilted the lecture “Can We Engineer Our Way to a Sustainable Future?” and use it to explore the tensions between what society needs, what it thinks it needs, the environmental limits to meeting these needs and how industry, science and technology is responding. He drew on his own learning journey from being a graduate and researcher in systems ecology to his present role of helping organisations make sense of the principles of sustainable development in their specific context. The crucial link he suggested was the way that energy transitions through systems: natural and sustainably designed systems such as those developed by Permaculture re-circulate energy while traditional engineered systems exploit a linear one-way flow of energy that is permanently lost to the system once the useful work has been done. He cited examples of modern design and engineering which used energy in a more organic way and blurred the boundaries between engineered and ecological systems. He concluded by echoing the late Dr. Steve Harris of the University of Glamorgan and the Schumacher Institute who believed that science and technology, if used responsibly, had a limitless capacity to deliver sustainable prosperity and social justice and should be elevated in the public and political mind as the means by which a sustainable future can be secured.

      His talk was followed by a reflective discussion in which the engineering professionals in the audience recalled how their industry has embraced ecological concepts in recent decades. Civil engineering firms are now multi-disciplinary and many in the audience had a life sciences background. While all accepted that engineers have enormous capacity to invent sustainable solutions and employ technology in harmony with nature, the reality is that creativity in engineering is largely constrained by legislation and economic imperatives. All accepted that the industry has and continues to change and despite challenges offers some excellent examples of practical sustainability. There is no room for complacency however and civil engineering companies can learn from other large corporates and should embrace the networking opportunities offered by the newly established partnership between Cynnal Cymru and The Institution of Civil Engineers who have recently joined Cynnal Cymru as a corporate member.

      Cynnal Cymru offers a variety of tailored training and professional development packages for individuals and organisations. If you would require further information or would like to discuss your training needs, please contact Rhodri Thomas, Training Manager by emailing training@cynnalcymru.com 

      Rhodri is educated to Masters level in Environmental Management and has worked for the Environment Agency and Forum For The Future among others. He has a Professional Graduate Certificate (PGCE) in Adult Education & Training. 

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