Day: May 13, 2021

How do we tackle the unequal impacts of climate change?

The climate crisis unfairly impacts some people more than others, based on gender, race, class, income, disability and location. Often those least responsible for causing the problem, are most likely to be impacted.

With a focus on the UK, this event considered how impacts will be felt unequally and how injustices could be addressed. Calling for the diverse voices of those impacted to be central to our response to the climate crisis.

Panellists:

  • Dr Michael Mikulewicz – Research Fellow, Centre for Climate Justice
  • Sarah Hopkins – Director, Cynnal Cymru / Sustain Wales
  • Suzanne Dhaliwal – Climate Justice Creative, Campaigner, Researcher, Lecturer in Environmental Justice and Trainer in Creative Strategies for Decolonisation
  • Ravina Singh – UK Cities Senior Engagement Officer, CDP

Video Contributors:

  • Liam Crouse – Organiser, Misneachd
  • Paul Cobbing – Chief Executive, National Flood Forum Michael Lomotey FRSA, MSc (he/him) – Adaptation Planning Specialist – for Climate and Ecology Repair.
  • Heather Shepherd – Flood Recovery Specialist, National Flood Forum
  • Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah – Co-Founder, Ella Roberta Family
  • Sunita – Blaenau Gwent Climate Assembly Member
  • Sadie DeCoste – Co-Founder and Director, Loss and Damage Youth
  • Ineza Umuhoza Grace – Co-Founder & Co-Director, Loss and Damage Youth Coalition Susie Fitton – Policy Officer, Inclusion Scotland

Watch or listen to a recording of this important discussion below:

Sustainability First are a UK think-tank and charity who promote practical ways to improve environmental, social and economic wellbeing in public utilities.

Related reads and resources:

Guardian article: New homes in poorer areas of England and Wales face undue flood risk
Friends of the Earth podcast: How are climate and racism connected?
Climate in Colour
IPPR report: Putting people at the heart of tackling the climate and nature emergency
Teach the Future
Black and Green Ambassadors Programme
Local Trust podcast: Community voices on climate change
What is a citizen’s assembly
Blaenau Gwent Climate Assembly recommendations
IPPR report: The Climate Commons
Carbon Literacy
Wellbeing of Future Generations (Wales) Act
Participatory budgeting
Local Trust: Big Local
Inclusion Scotland webinar: Climate change, disability and Eco-ableism – and webinar briefing
Stop Climate Chaos blog: Disability, climate justice and eco-ableism

Wales Nature Week is coming! 29 May – 6 June 2021

One of the key messages emerging from lockdown has been a heightened awareness – or perhaps renewed appreciation – of the importance and benefits of nature. Gardens, parks, walks along open spaces, even balconies to experience bird song or rooms with a view of woodland or hedgerows have all been embraced, with growing recognition that these are not just nice-to-have backdrops but something fundamental to our well-being – anchors in daily life that restore and revive us.

If this rings true for you, and you have also found nature to be a soothing and restorative presence, then there is an opportunity to repay some of this natural bounty, and even help it spread, through Wales Nature Week, starting at the end of May.

Wales Nature Week is an annual celebration of the often overlooked but nonetheless incredible habitats and species of Wales. Temperate rainforests, globally significant seabird populations, insects and spiders found nowhere else in the world – these are all on our doorstep, alongside species recently re-introduced or coming back from the brink such as beavers, pine martens and red squirrels.

Through its virtual programme, which includes a participative Garden BioBlitz, Wales Nature Week shines a light each day on different habitat types and the species they support. There will also be helpful tips and support from a community of experts for anyone curious to learn more, particularly about how we as individuals can give back to nature in our homes or workplaces.

As the amount of land left to wilderness and wildlife shrinks, our collective potential contribution to nature recovery, as citizens, homeowners and inhabitants of work premises, becomes increasingly important. We explore this, and other contributions that individuals and organisations can make to nature restoration, in our new training course, Nature Wise – Nabod Natur, which we will launch on World Environment Day on 5 June.

If you want to learn more about the links between human activity and ecosystem disruption and develop the knowledge to enable you and your organisation to take action for nature recovery, then we hope that this will be the course for you. Please get in touch if you’d like to know more.

In the meantime however, for more insights into how anyone can take practical actions to help nature thrive, take a look at the Environmental Volunteering resource on our site and remember to sit back, recharge, re-energise and give back through logging in to Wales Nature Week.

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